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Voice of America, 99-11-21

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] CLINTON - GREECE (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ATHENS)
  • [02] CLINTON - THREAT (S ONLY) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE)
  • [03] CLINTON - CONFERENCE (S-ONITER) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE, ITALY)
  • [04] CLINTON - CONFERENCE (L-O) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE, ITALY)
  • [05] CLINTON - BULGARIA (S) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE, ITALY)

  • [01] CLINTON - GREECE (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ATHENS)

    DATE=11/20/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256392
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT: Intro: President Clinton on Saturday concluded a daylong visit to Greece, where violent anti-American protests a day earlier overshadowed his stay. The President expressed hope that the incident would not undermine good overall U-S - Greek ties. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Athens. Text: While underscoring the right of citizens in a democracy to demonstrate, Mr. Clinton also said he strongly believes protests should be peaceful. At a joint news conference with Greek Prime Minister Costas Simitis Saturday, Mr. Clinton said he hoped the demonstrations would not affect bilateral relations.

    /// Clinton actuality ///

    I would hope that most Greek citizens would, like the Greek government, believe that there is value in our relationship and our partnership, and even if there is a disagreement, we cannot allow that to undermine our relationship or our partnership.

    /// End Act ///

    For his part, Mr. Simitis said Greece is a country where citizens can freely express their views - if it is done peacefully, as the law requires. He expressed regret that some protesters did not respect the law. Many Greeks are angry at the United States for leading the NATO bombing campaign over Yugoslavia, and blame Washington for supporting a 1967 military junta in Greece that lasted until 1974. On the latter issue, Mr. Clinton expressed understanding for the Greeks' position during a speech to community and business leaders later in the day.

    /// Clinton Act ///

    When the junta took over in 1967 here, the United States allowed its interests in prosecuting the Cold War to prevail over its interests - I should say its obligation - to support democracy, which was, after all, the cause for which we fought the Cold War. It is important that we acknowledge that.

    /// End Act ///

    But on the issue of the NATO bombing raids over Yugoslavia - an effort that forced Serb troops from Kosovo - Mr. Clinton defended the policy on strategic as well as moral grounds.

    /// Clinton Act ///

    I do not believe we could have allowed an entire people to be exiled from their homes or extinguished from the earth, simply because of their ethnic heritage or how they worship God.

    /// End Act ///

    Mr. Clinton praised Greece for its role in peacekeeping operations in Kosovo and its help in rebuilding the province - efforts that he said would help stabilize southeastern Europe. He appealed to Athens to take other actions to promote stability and security in the region - including improving relations with Turkey and dropping its opposition to Ankara's membership in the European Union. And he vowed to do all he can to support upcoming proximity talks between Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders early next month in New York - a meeting aimed at opening the way to direct negotiations. (Signed)
    NEB/DAT/JP 20-Nov-1999 09:58 AM EDT (20-Nov-1999 1458 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] CLINTON - THREAT (S ONLY) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE)

    DATE=11/20/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256398
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: US officials have confirmed there was a security alert aboard President Clinton's plane as he travelled from Greece to Italy Saturday night. Nothing suspicious was discovered following a highly unusual airborne search of the plane. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Florence, Italy. Text: Twenty minutes after Air Force One left Athens, Greece for Pisa, Italy, White House spokesman Joe Lockhart asked reporters to search their luggage for any suspicious objects. A few minutes later, the head of the President's security service made the same request. Later, Mr. Lockhart told reporters they could presume from the exercise that there had been a threat. He refused to give any details. After Air Force One landed safely in Pisa, a senior adminstration official said nothing suspicious was found following a search of the aircraft. Security had been a concern in Greece, where a series of violent anti-American protests in the run-up to Mr. Clinton's visit prompted the President to delay and to shorten a planned three-day stay in Athens to 22 hours. (signed)
    NEB/DAT/PT 20-Nov-1999 16:42 PM EDT (20-Nov-1999 2142 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] CLINTON - CONFERENCE (S-ONITER) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE, ITALY)

    DATE=11/20/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256400
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton is in Florence, Italy, the third stop on his five-nation European tour. On Sunday, he attends a conference on governing. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports. Text: Mr. Clinton will join the heads of state from Britain, France, Italy and Brazil in a day-long conference to discuss a philosophy of governing embraced by these leaders. It is a philosphy that blends the principles of social justice - including better health care and workers' rights - with capitalist economic principles aimed at global competitiveness. Mr. Clinton spoke about the idea in a speech on the eve of the conference.

    // Clinton actuality //

    We think it is a great challenge to marry our conceptions of social justice and equal opportunity with our commitment to globalization. We think we will have to find what has often been called `a third way' - a way that requires governments to empower people with tools and conditions necessary for individuals, families, communities, and nations to make the most of their human potential.

    // end act //

    Following the conference, MR. Clinton leaves for Sofia, Bulgaria. (Signed)
    NEB/DAT/PT 20-Nov-1999 18:04 PM EDT (20-Nov-1999 2304 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] CLINTON - CONFERENCE (L-O) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE, ITALY)

    DATE=11/21/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256406
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton spent his day participating in a conference about progressive government. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Florence.

    TEXT: It is billed as a conference on the -- third way -- a philosophy of governing that blends principles of economic growth with those of social justice. President Clinton was joined by a group of left-of- center leaders, including British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Italian Prime Minister Massimo D'Alema, Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin, and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder. Mr. Clinton argued that wealthy nations have a responsibility to help developing nations through trade, supporting economic empowerment programs, and debt relief.

    // CLINTON ACT //

    It is insane to keep these poor countries spending all their money making interest payments - they cannot even pay off the principle. They will never be able to grow, and they have no money to buy our products.

    // END ACT //

    Then, citing the situation in the United States, the President noted there are some who have been left behind in the strong U-S economic expansion. He called for more education and training to keep the country competitive in the global marketplace.

    // CLINTON ACT //

    We have to deal with more investment in education, more investment in transition aid, a strategy to get capital to people in places left behind, a strategy to close the digital divide, and we have to make the most of the new technologies, especially in environmental areas - and the opportunities for isolated people and places to make money because of the internet, not in spite of it.

    // END ACT //

    Later, Mr. Clinton travels to Bulgaria for a state visit. He will meet with Bulgarian leaders and deliver a public address in which he is expected to praise the country's economic and political transformation. The President concludes his 10-day, five-nation European tour Tuesday with a brief visit to the Yugoslavia's Kosovo Province. (SIGNED)
    NEB/DAT/LTD/RAE 21-Nov-1999 08:42 AM EDT (21-Nov-1999 1342 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] CLINTON - BULGARIA (S) BY DEBORAH TATE (FLORENCE, ITALY)

    DATE=11/21/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256410
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    /////

    CLINTON LEAVES ITALY 2:35PM EST; ARRIVES BULGARIA 5PM EST. /////

    INTRO: President Clinton has concluded a day-long visit to Italy and is making Bulgaria the fourth stop of his five-nation European tour. Correspondent Deborah Tate filed this preview from Florence, Italy, before departing with the President to the Bulgarian capital.

    TEXT: Mr. Clinton will use his visit to encourage Bulgarian leaders to continue democratic and economic reform. Bulgaria was often described as one of the most Stalinist of the East Bloc countries during the Cold War. Ambassador Chris Hill, who is with the National Security Council, says Bulgaria is undergoing remarkable change - some of it, difficult.

    // HILL ACT //

    Bulgaria has seen, in the last few years, a collapse of their currency, huge unemployment, and various other structural problems. And yet, in the last couple of years, Bulgaria has begun to turn a very important corner in its transition.

    // END ACT //

    Mr. Clinton is expected to praise the commitment made by the Bulgarian government to multi-ethnic democracy and open markets, and address the Bulgarian people. (SIGNED)
    NEB/DAT/LTD/RAE 21-Nov-1999 11:12 AM EDT (21-Nov-1999 1612 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America
    Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
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