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Voice of America, 99-11-19

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] CLINTON - GREECE (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ATHENS)
  • [02] CLINTON - GREECE ONITER (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ATHENS)
  • [03] YUGO CLAIMS KOSOVO ABUSES (L ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)
  • [04] O-S-C-E EVOLUTION BY LAURIE KASSMAN (ISTANBUL)
  • [05] OSCE WRAP (S) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (ISTANBUL)
  • [06] CLINTON - RUSSIA (S) BY DEBORAH TATE (ISTANBUL)
  • [07] NY ECON WRAP FRIDAY (S&L) BY JOE CHAPMAN (NEW YORK)
  • [08] FRIDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ERIKA EVANS (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] CLINTON - GREECE (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ATHENS)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256369
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton has arrived in Athens as thousands of anti - U-S protesters clashed with riot police in the city's main square. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from the Greek capital. Text: Mr. Clinton stepped off Air Force late Friday saying he is "a friend of Greece" and that Washington is a close ally of Athens.

    /// Clinton actuality ///

    Our nations have so much in common. We are allies with a shared commitment to peace and security, democracies with a long tradition of impassioned political debate.

    /// End Act //

    But in Constitution Square in central Athens, thousands of demonstrators burned American flags. Riot police used tear gas to disperse them. Many in Greece are angry at the United States for NATO's bombing campaign over Yugoslavia earlier this year. Before leaving for Athens from Istanbul, Turkey earlier Friday, Mr. Clinton said he was not concerned about the possibility of Greek protests. But Greek authorities were - and banned demonstrations around the U-S Embassy. In addition, they banned traffic in both directions along Mr. Clinton's motorcade route from the airport - leaving it virtually deserted with the exception of a heavy police presence. The president originally was to have begun his visit to Greece last Saturday, but at the request of the Greek government, he delayed his trip because of a series of violent anti - U-S protests. He has also shortened his stay here to one day, down from the three days he had initially planned. In is meeting with Greek leaders, Mr. Clinton is expected to call for better relations between Greece and Turkey, its long-time rival and fellow NATO member, as well as an agreement between Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders to hold indirect talks in New York early next month - a meeting aimed at opening the way for direct talks on the future of Cyprus. (Signed)
    NEB/DAT/JP 19-Nov-1999 13:40 PM EDT (19-Nov-1999 1840 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] CLINTON - GREECE ONITER (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ATHENS)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256378
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton - traveling in Athens - meets Saturday with Greek leaders to discuss prospects for improved relations between Greece and Turkey and the future of Cyprus. Upon his arrival from Istanbul, Turkey Friday night, anti-US protesters clashed with riot police in the city's main square. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from the Greek capital. Text: Mr. Clinton is expected to use his meetings with President Constantinos Stephanopoulos and Prime Minister Costas Simitis to encourage Greece to seek reconciliation with Turkey. He has argued that better relations between the long- time rivals and fellow Nato members would be an important step toward stability in southeastern Europe. His talks with Greek leaders are also expected to include Cyprus - another issue with implications for the stability of the region. During State dinner toasts at the Presidential Mansion Friday night, Mr. Clinton praised plans by Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders to hold indirect talks on Cyprus in New York next month - a meeting aimed at paving the way to direct negotiations.

    // Clinton atuality //

    I am encouraged by the proximity talks which have just been announced on Cyprus, and I commit to you and the people of Greece my best efforts to help you resolve those issues.

    // end act //

    The President praised close ties between Washington and Athens - noting that Greece is one of seven nations that have stood with the United States in every major international conflict in this century. And yet, just blocks away, thousands of demonstrators turned out in Constitution Square and burned American flags. Police used tear gas to break up the protests. Many Greeks are angry at the United States for Nato's bombing campaign over Yugoslavia earlier this year. Mr. Clinton made no direct reference to the protests in his dinner toast, but he did say close allies do not always have to see eye-to-eye.

    // Clinton actuality //

    As in all friendships, we have not always agreed, but we have never broken ranks, because of our shared devotion to democracy and freedom.

    // end act //

    Later Saturday, MR. Clinton speaks to Greek community and business leaders before departing for Italy - the third stop on his five-nation tour. The President had originally planned to spend three days in Greece, but shortened the visit to just 24 hours because of a series of anti-US protests that began earlier this month. (Signed)
    NEB/DAT/PT 19-Nov-1999 17:35 PM EDT (19-Nov-1999 2235 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [03] YUGO CLAIMS KOSOVO ABUSES (L ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256379
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The representative of Yugoslavia's to the United Nations charged today (Friday) that the U-N Mission in Kosovo is abusing its authority and not living up to its mandate. At the United Nations, VOA Correspondent Breck Ardery reports.

    TEXT: Vladislav Jovanovic told reporters that the U-N mission in Kosovo has appeared to change from helping to create conditions for autonomy to allowing independence forces in Kosovo to gain greater influence. He charged that the Kosovo Liberation Army, the K-L-A, is committing atrocities against Serbs and that neither the U-N Interim Administration nor NATO military forces are doing anything to stop the K-L-A. Mr. Jovanovic claimed homes owned by Serbs in Kosovo have been looted and burned and that the K-L-A has organized mobs of ethnic Albanians to attack Serbs and other ethnic minorities. He repeatedly used the phrase "ethnic cleansing" to describe the conditions in Kosovo.

    ///Jovanovic act///

    There has been systematic ethnic cleansing by Albanian separatists and terrorists perpetrated in the sight of representatives of the international community who are charged with preventing it.

    ///end act///

    Mr. Jovanovic says Bernard Kouchner, the U-N Interim Administrator in Kosovo has disrespected Yugoslav territorial integrity in Kosovo. He says repeated complaints by Yugoslavia about conditions in Kosovo have been largely ignored by the United Nations. Both the U-N Security Council and U-N Secretary General Kofi Annan have been strongly supportive of Mr. Kouchner's work in Kosovo. After a meeting with Council members earlier this month, Mr. Kouchner said the protection of ethnic minorities in Kosovo is a major priority. The Yugoslav Mission to the United Nations has been reduced to something similar to "observer" status. The United Nations says the former Yugoslavia no longer exists. Although the Belgrade government claims a seat in the U-N General Assembly, it is not allowed to vote.(Signed) NEB/UN/BA/LSF/PT 19-Nov-1999 17:42 PM EDT (19-Nov-1999 2242 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] O-S-C-E EVOLUTION BY LAURIE KASSMAN (ISTANBUL)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=BACKGROUND REPORT
    NUMBER=5-44796
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The 54-member Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe -- the O-S-C-E -- has completed its two-day summit in Istanbul with a consensus on the need to enhance its role in peacekeeping and prevention of the spread of conflict in Europe. The group also expanded its area of concern to actions within the borders of its member countries that pose a threat to regional stability. V-O-A Correspondent Laurie Kassman takes a closer look at the European security organization that traces its origins to an accord signed in Helsinki a quarter of a century ago.

    TEXT: Czech President Vaclav Havel remembers the signing of the Helsinki Act 25 years ago. He says it took a leap of faith back then to trust that Cold War enemies would actually abide by an agreement to reduce their nuclear and conventional forces and decrease the risk of war.

    /// HAVEL ACT ///

    Many believed that this was only a ruse through which Communist leaders won from the West a confirmation of the legitimacy of the European status quo and thus implicitly of the division of Europe in return for promises which they had no intention of keeping.

    /// END ACT ///

    Nearly a quarter of century later, the atmosphere of reconciliation is a reality. Europe is clearly shifting from conflict to cooperation. In that context, the O-S-C-E is expanding its mandate and its responsibilities. It has become an integral part of international peacekeeping missions and now encourages international responsibility for dealing with conflicts that develop -- even within national borders. Not every member favors that approach. Russian President Boris Yeltsin balked at O-S-C-E efforts to help resolve the Chechen crisis and disapproves of what he calls outside interference -- even for humanitarian reasons. He is heard through an interpreter.

    /// YELTSIN INTERPRETER ACT ///

    Not all the ideas that have arisen in the course of discussion about Europe seem to be justified. I'm thinking in particular of the appeals for humanitarian interference -- this is a new idea -- in the internal affairs of another state, even when this is done on the pretext of protecting human rights and freedom.

    /// END ACT ///

    President Bill Clinton has countered that argument, pointing out the interdependence of states committed to the basic principles of democracy. In his speech to the summit, he reminded President Yeltsin of the benefits of interference had he been jailed for his own daring reforms.

    /// CLINTON ACT ///

    If they had put you in jail instead of electing you president, I would hope that every leader of every country around this table would have stood up for you and for freedom in Russia and not said that is an internal Russian affair that we cannot be a part of.

    /// END ACT ///

    The O-S-C-E's expanded mandate for peacekeeping also signals Europe's shift from confrontation to reconciliation, which is apparent now in several disputes. Armenia's president, Robert Kocharian, points to direct talks with Azerbaijan -- not war -- as the best way to resolve the dispute between the two countries over Nagorno-Karabach. He is heard through an interpreter.

    /// KOCHARIAN INTERPRETER ACT//

    Realizing that resolution of the conflict serves the interests of our peoples, we, through direct contact, are trying to convey to each other and to the rest of the world the seriousness of our purpose and resolve.

    /// END ACT ///

    Cypriot leaders appear to be on the same path as they prepare for proximity talks on the future of the divided island. Even Greece and Turkey are sounding more reconciliatory about how to resolve their diplomatic disputes. So, is it time for the O-S-C-E to declare success? Norwegian Prime Minister Kjel-Magne Bondevik says "not yet."

    /// BONDEVIK ACT ///

    We must strengthen conflict prevention. Open conflict mean political failure. The military option is the costliest one in resources and human suffering. The lesson learned is this we must redouble our efforts to defuse tension and contain disputes before they turn into open conflict.

    /// END ACT ///

    The Norwegian leader also underscores Europe's responsibilities in pressuring states to initiate and implement democratic reforms. That can mean interference or isolation or both. Europe's isolation of Yugoslavia through sanctions and support of the political opposition there is the latest example of the new approach. Yugoslavia -- one of the founders of the O-S-C-E -- is the only member absent from the summit gathering. (Signed)
    NEB/LMK/JWH/KL 19-Nov-1999 10:27 AM EDT (19-Nov-1999 1527 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] OSCE WRAP (S) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (ISTANBUL)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256365
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe - the O-S-C-E - has ended its two day summit in Istanbul with a security charter designed to expand the organization's peacekeeping role. Russia at first resisted an O-S-C-E role in resolving the conflict in Chechnya. But, as V-O-A Correspondent Laurie Kassman reports from Istanbul, a final summit declaration that recognizes Russia's right to fight terrorism helped produce a compromise.

    TEXT: The current O-S-C-E chairman, Knut Vollebaek of Norway, says the key to the final summit consensus was Russia's acceptance of the O-S-C-E's demand to fulfill its 1995 mandate to help seek a political solution to the Chechen conflict.

    /// VOLLEBAEK ACT ///

    I think that is a very important acceptance from the Russian side and I thought that would be the most difficult one.

    /// END ACT ///

    Russia had resisted what it called outside interference in Chechnya, but it relented after negotiating language in the declaration that recognizes Russia's territorial integrity. Moscow also agreed to let Mr. Vollebaek visit the region, which he expects to do as soon as possible. (Signed)
    NEB/LMK/JWH/JP 19-Nov-1999 09:18 AM EDT (19-Nov-1999 1418 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] CLINTON - RUSSIA (S) BY DEBORAH TATE (ISTANBUL)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256355
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton says he is encouraged that Russia is signing a European security charter that says the international community has a right to intervene in civil conflicts. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Istanbul, Turkey, where Mr. Clinton is attending (attended) the closing session of a summit of the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe - a meeting that was dominated by the war in Chechnya. Text: Russia has made no commitment to ending its bloody military campaign in Chechnya, nor has it committed itself to opening a dialogue with Chechen leaders - as President Clinton and other summit participants here have appealed to Moscow to do. But Mr. Clinton says Russia's decision to sign on to an OSCE charter, which says international intervention in civil conflicts is justified, is a step in the right direction.

    // Clinton actuality //

    This is a significant move by Russia.

    // end act //

    Mr. Clinton says it is also encouraging that Russia has agreed to allow OSCE chairman in office, Norwegian Foreign Minister Knut Vollebaek, to visit Chechnya. He says that compared to how the summit began Thursday when Russian President Boris Yeltsin rejected international criticism of Moscow's actions in Chechnya - the two developments are, as he put it, hopeful. (Signed) Neb/dat/plm 19-Nov-1999 05:19 AM EDT (19-Nov-1999 1019 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [07] NY ECON WRAP FRIDAY (S&L) BY JOE CHAPMAN (NEW YORK)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256381
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Stock price on Wall Street closed mixed today (Friday). But high technology stocks continued their strong surge. VOA's Joe Chapman reports from New York.

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average edged downward 31 points to 11-thousand-three after Caterpillar, one of the 30 component stocks of the Dow, reported lower than expected earnings. For the week, the Dow Jones Industrial Average moved up 234 points, about two percent. The Standard and Poor's 500, a broader and more representative index, moved up 22 points for the week, just under two percent. But the Nasdaq Composite closed up 22 points for the day, less than one percent, to three-thousand-369, for its 13th record close in 16 trading days. The Nasdaq was up four percent for the week.

    /// rest opt for long ///

    Analyst Ted Weisberg says despite the drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average the last day of the week really was not all that different from Thursday when the average moved up 152 points.

    ///weisberg act///

    It's true we had a Dow up 150 points, but it was concentrated mostly in one, possibly two stocks. The money is certainly flowing into the market, but the list where it's going is quite narrow.

    ///end act///

    Mr. Weisberg says after trading in a narrow range for a time, he expects the stock market to resume moving upward. Telecommunications firms were very active after Britain's Vodafone bid 128 billion dollars for Germany's Mannesman conglomerate. If the deal is closed, it will be the largest corporate merger or takeover ever. (Signed) NEB/NYC/JMC/LSF/PT 19-Nov-1999 17:54 PM EDT (19-Nov-1999 2254 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [08] FRIDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ERIKA EVANS (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=11/19/1999
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11561
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-2702
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: With Cuba hosting the annual summit of Latin and Iberian peninsula nations this week, many of today's U-S editorials are discussing the outcome of the meeting as well as U-S policy on Cuba. There are also editorial comments about Russian policy in Chechnya, U-S labor unions' criticism of China's prospective membership in the World Trade Organization, and Ireland close to peace. Now here is _________with some excerpts and a closer look in today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: Many heads of state and other high ranking officials arrived in Havana, Cuba earlier this week for the Ibero-American Summit. Summit participants were expected to focus on developing nations and the problems they face in becoming part of the global economy. The summit prompted the Chicago Tribune to comment on the future of Cuban leader Fidel Castro and the lack of meaningful U-S policy on Cuba. The paper writes:

    VOICE: (Mr.) Castro had wanted the summit to grant his regime an official international imprimatur, but several of his guests - most notably the president of Spain and the foreign minister of Mexico - pointedly took some time to meet with small groups of dissidents. If anything was legitimized by the summit, it was not (Mr.) Castro's government but his vocal opposition. The summit was hardly a loss for (Mr.) Castro though. The theme of economic globalization provided a ready-made forum for him to berate neo-liberalism and "savage capitalism". .In practical terms the summit's proclamations don't have much significance - except as a reminder of how the American obsession with isolating Cuba has isolated the U-S instead. In fact, as the Havana meeting neared, the only move available to Secretary of State Madeline Albright was to write letters to all the summiteers, exhorting them to please scold Castro for his sorry human rights record. Hardly an impressive or effective foreign policy maneuver.

    TEXT: The Los Angeles Times believes the summit gave proof that the U-S must find a better way to deal with Cuba.

    VOICE: From the U-S perspective, the summit showed once again the obsolescence of Washington's Cuba policies. At the end of the century, the United States retains a policy of boycotts and embargoes meant for the Cold War instead of the constructive engagement that marks U-S policy toward other troublesome governments.... The leaders of this summit have shown the world the right way to deal with Cuba. It is high time for a radical change in U-S policy.

    TEXT: Turning from Cuba to Chechnya, the New York Times is commenting on the conflict in Chechnya and the inability of Western leaders to push Russia toward peaceful resolution.

    VOICE: President Boris Yelstin of Russia growled this week at Western leaders meeting in Turkey that they had no right to criticize his nation's war against "bandits and murderers" in Chechnya. On this point the Russian president is simply wrong. The Russians must realize that good will in the West and especially in America is in their best interest as well. The stream of refugees from Chechnya and the bombings in downtown Grozny are images the American people care about. In the long run, these cruelties add to American doubts, not simply about Chechnya, but about the willingness of Russia's leaders to move away from the brutal methods of the past.

    TEXT: The Washington Times has a comment on American labor unions and their objections to China's looming membership in the World Trade Organization. The paper believes the union's concerns are legitimate.

    VOICE: Admitting China, a notorious abuser of labor rights, to the W-T-O is anathema to the A-F-L/C-I-O. .China's reprehensible labor policies clearly violate the norms of acceptable international behavior. The federation is right to be repulsed. But the place to hold China accountable for its despicable behavior is not the W-T-O.. The place to deal with China's abhorrent labor record is the International Labor Organization (I-L-O), a union affiliated agency that specifically addresses the rights of workers. .The A- F-L/C-I-O would earn far more credibility by seeking to expel China and its totalitarian labor policies from the I-L-O than by pursuing its wide-ranging, self-serving protectionist policies within the confines of the W-T-O.

    TEXT: Finally, discussing the recent agreement between Protestant and Catholics parties in Northern Ireland, the Washington Post says the troubled nation may be on the threshold of peace.

    VOICE: The mood is of hope but caution too. .One hesitates to say this is Northern Ireland's "last chance." But most people would probably concede that it is simply not possible to imagine how the disruption of this accord could bring profit to anyone except the men of violence on both sides. Failure would deny Protestants and Catholics alike the chance they still have, despite everything, for a decent future.

    TEXT: With that view from the Washington Post, we conclude this sampling of commentary from the editorial pages of Friday's U-S newspapers.
    NEB/ENE/KL 19-Nov-1999 13:36 PM EDT (19-Nov-1999 1836 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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