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Voice of America, 99-11-15

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] CLINTON-TURKEY (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)
  • [02] CLINTON - TURKEY (L UPDATE) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)
  • [03] CLINTON - TURKEY ONITER (L-ONLY) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)
  • [04] TURKEY QUAKE (L ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)
  • [05] MACEDONIA ELECTION (L ONLY) BY BETH POTTER (SPLIT, CROATIA)
  • [06] U-N SREBRENICA REPORT (L-ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)
  • [07] U-N-BOSNIA PRESIDENTS (L-ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)
  • [08] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA (L) BY PETER HEINLEIN (MOSCOW)
  • [09] EDITORIAL: TIME FOR ELECTIONS IN SERBIA
  • [10] E-U - DEFENSE (L-ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)
  • [11] E-U / CHECHNYA (L-ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)
  • [12] NORTHERN IRELAND (L ONLY) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (LONDON)
  • [13] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)
  • [14] MONDAY'S EDITORIALS BY NICK SIMEONE (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] CLINTON-TURKEY (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256181
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton and Turkish President Suleyman Demirel have concluded talks in Ankara that touched on a broad range of issues, and included a candid assessment of Turkey's human-rights situation. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from the Turkish capital. Text: Turkey has long been criticized by human-rights groups for allowing repression -- including torture -- against political opponents. In an appearance before reporters with Mr. Clinton after the talks, Mr. Demirel -- speaking through a translator -- bluntly acknowledged there is a problem.

    // DEMIREL ACT //

    It is impossible to say that there is no torture in Turkey. There is torture. But torture is not state policy. Torture is a crime.

    // END ACT //

    The Turkish President said his country is taking steps to stop such abuse by investigating and punishing those found guilty of it. Mr. Clinton said Turkey is improving its human-rights record, but said he would like to see more progress in the area of freedom of expression. On other issues, Mr. Clinton praised the warming of relations between Turkey and its rival and fellow NATO member, Greece, as a result of the two countries' assistance to one another in the aftermath of earthquakes in both nations. The President also endorsed Turkey's bid for entry into the European Union. The European body has rejected Ankara's bid in the past, partly because of Turkey's human rights record.

    // CLINTON ACT //

    I feel very strongly that one of the four or five key questions to the future of this whole part of the world is whether Turkey is a full partner with the European Union.

    // END ACT //

    Mr. Demirel called the United States a strategic partner, and said Mr. Clinton's visit would strengthen bilateral ties. (SIGNED)
    NEB/DAT/RAE 15-Nov-1999 10:45 AM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1545 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] CLINTON - TURKEY (L UPDATE) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256188
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton has issued a strong appeal to Turkey to improve its human rights record. Mr. Clinton, visiting Ankara, raised the issue in a meeting with President Suleyman Demirel and in a speech to Turkey's parliament. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Turkey's capital. Text: Mr. Clinton chose his words carefully in discussing the sensitive issue of human rights. In a speech to the Turkish parliament, Mr. Clinton praised the country's recent efforts to improve the situation -- from edicts banning torture to a new law protecting the rights of political parties. But he said more needs to be done -- especially in the area of freedom of expression.

    // CLINTON ACT //

    When writers and journalists freely express themselves, they exercise not only a fundamental right, but fuel the exchange of ideas essential to prosperity and growth. When peaceful outlets exist to express normal human differences, peace is preserved, not shattered.

    // END ACT //

    International human rights groups have condemned Turkey for detaining, and in some cases, torturing journalists. Most of those have been accused of being sympathetic to the Kurdish Workers' Party, which Ankara considers a terrorist organization. Mr. Clinton said he raised the issue because the United States considers Turkey a friend, and in so doing, acknowledged the United States has had an imperfect record on human rights, particularly its history with slavery. Earlier, following talks with Mr. Clinton, President Demirel acknowledged his country has a human rights problem. He spoke through a translator.

    // DEMIREL ACT //

    It is impossible to say that there is no torture in Turkey. There is torture. But torture is not state policy. Torture is a crime.

    // END ACT //

    The Turkish President said his country is taking steps to stop such abuse by investigating and punishing those found guilty of it. On other issues, Mr. Clinton praised the warming of relations between Turkey and its rival, and fellow NATO member, Greece. The two recently assisted one another in the aftermath of earthquakes in both nations. The President also endorsed Turkey's bid for entry into the European Union. The European body has rejected Ankara's bid in the past, partly because of Turkey's human rights record. (SIGNED)
    NEB/DAT/RAE 15-Nov-1999 12:59 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1759 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [03] CLINTON - TURKEY ONITER (L-ONLY) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256195
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton - traveling in Turkey - visits the western city of Izmit Tuesday, the area hardest hit in last August's devastating earthquake. Correspondent Deborah Tate has a preview.

    TEXT: At a state dinner in Ankara on the eve of his visit to Izmit, Mr. Clinton pledged the United States would help Turkey rebuild from earthquake devastation.

    /// FIRST CLINTON ACTUALITY ///

    Please let us know what we can do to help, and we will be there.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Clinton will meet with earthquake survivors and relief workers at a camp in Izmit set up by U-S Marines. The camp is home to some six-thousand people, who live in tents. The August 17th earthquake killed 17-thousand people. The United States was among the first countries to respond in the rescue and relief operation. On Monday, Mr. Clinton announced additional assistance.

    /// SECOND CLINTON ACTUALITY ///

    We have dispatched a search and rescue team to the area and sent tents to house 10-thousand people made homeless. Our Export-Import Bank has allocated one billion dollars in lending authority to help Turkish businesses finance projects related to reconstruction.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Clinton is not expected to visit the site of last Friday's earthquake in northwestern Turkey, saying he did not want to interfere with the ongoing rescue and clean-up operations. Turkish President Suleyman Demirel thanked Mr. Clinton for what he called the support and solidarity of the American people toward Turkey in the aftermath of the earthquakes. (Signed) NEB/DAT/TVM/gm 15-Nov-1999 16:26 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 2126 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] TURKEY QUAKE (L ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256184
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Survivors of Friday's massive earthquake in northwestern Turkey are still having trouble finding adequate shelter, three-days after losing their homes. Amberin Zaman in Ankara reports Turkish officials say at least 450-people died in the earthquake, the second major quake to strike Turkey in three months.

    TEXT: Scores of survivors of Turkey's latest earthquake are struggling with freezing temperatures. They await tents and food three-days after the quake measuring seven-point-two on the Richter scale destroyed their homes. Those who were given tents say that they do not provide adequate protection against seasonal rain and cold. Both Turkish and international rescue workers are continuing to sift through the rubble for signs of survivors, as families implore them not to give up the search for loved ones still missing. The Turkish government has been widely praised for its swift response to Friday's quake, both in dispatching rescue teams and emergency supplies. The government was criticized for a belated reaction to the massive August 17th quake that claimed 17-thousand lives. The government has also been widely criticized for urging survivors of the August quake to move back into their homes. Many who did so were either killed or injured in the latest earthquake. Some Turkish newspapers charged the government had insisted the survivors return to their homes to avoid paying rent subsidies it had pledged for victims. As many as 600-thousand people are thought to have been left homeless by the August 17th quake. Many are living in flimsy tents, despite government pledges to provide winterized shelter by the end of October. Turkish officials say 700-buildings were either damaged or destroyed in Friday's earthquake, which was centered on the town of Duzce, about 170-kilometers east of Istanbul. A steady stream of survivors has been leaving the town with the few belongings they were able to retrieve -- many vowing never to return. (SIGNED)
    NEB/AZ/JWH/RAE 15-Nov-1999 12:09 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1709 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [05] MACEDONIA ELECTION (L ONLY) BY BETH POTTER (SPLIT, CROATIA)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256183
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A last-minute get-out-the-vote drive by ethnic Albanians in Macedonia apparently helped the country's deputy foreign minister Boris Trajkovski win the presidential election. But as Beth Potter reports, the opposition candidate is charging fraud.

    TEXT: Macedonia's central election commission said the turnout in Sunday's second-round election was 70- percent. Mr. Trajkovski was declared the winner after a preliminary vote tally, leading Social Democratic candidate Tito Petkovski by an estimated 77-thousand votes of more than one-million cast. International election observers reported irregularities at a number of polling stations in western Macedonia and around Skopje, the capital. Western Macedonia is heavily populated by ethnic Albanians, a voter base courted by Mr. Trajkovski in recent weeks. Observers say they saw large scale "proxy" voting, or one person carrying identification for several other people and voting for them, and a few instances of multiple voting. The government election commission reported that in some areas, the number of ballots was larger than the number of registered voters.

    /// OPT ///

    The Social Democrats, called for supporters to join a protest rally in Skopje. /// END OPT /// Macedonia's stability is seen by Western diplomats as key in NATO's continued movement of troops and supplies across the border into Kosovo. While fighting and tension has continued between ethnic minorities in other former Yugoslav republics, Macedonia, in large part, has been able to keep all ethnic groups working together, including a small ethnic-Serb population. (SIGNED)
    NEB/BP/JWH/RAE 15-Nov-1999 12:00 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1700 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] U-N SREBRENICA REPORT (L-ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256170
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    /// Running out of sequence ///

    INTRO: The United Nations today (Monday) released a report on the 1995 massacre at Srebrenica. The document says the United Nations has learned some important lessons from what it calls one of the worst war crimes in Europe since the end of World War Two. V-O-A Correspondent Breck Ardery reports from the United Nations.

    TEXT: The report focuses on what led up to the events of July, 1995 when, during the Bosnian war, Serbian forces took Srebrenica and proceeded to massacre thousands of Bosnian Muslims. The U-N Security Council had declared Srebrenica one of several "safe" areas, but a small group of Dutch "peacekeeping" soldiers was unable to defend Srebrenica. The report blames serious misjudgments on the part of the United Nations, misjudgments which included an inability to recognize the "scope of evil" confronting the people of Srebrenica from Serb forces. The report says NATO air strikes should have been authorized to stop the Serb assault and that an arms embargo against Bosnia should have been lifted. The Srebrenica report, which was ordered by the U-N General Assembly, says the massacre carries some important lessons for the United Nations. One is that peacekeepers should never again be deployed into an area in which there is no peace agreement. Another is that so-called "safe areas" must be fully demilitarized or fully defended by a credible military deterrent. But the central lesson in the report is that a deliberate and systematic attempt to murder an entire people must be met decisively with all necessary means. Twenty-two hundred bodies have been recovered from mass graves at Srebrenica, but the Red Cross estimates more than seven thousand people are still "missing" and are presumed to have been murdered. (Signed) NEB/BA/LSF/TVM/gm 15-Nov-1999 15:29 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 2029 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [07] U-N-BOSNIA PRESIDENTS (L-ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256201
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: All three members of Bosnia's joint presidency appeared before the United Nations Security Council today (Monday) to re-affirm their commitment to a fully integrated, multi-ethnic nation. At the United Nations, V-O-A Correspondent Breck Ardery reports the presidents also issued a declaration to strengthen Bosnia's national institutions.

    TEXT: It was the first time that all three members of the Bosnian presidency, representing the Croats, Serbs, and Muslims, had ever appeared together in the Security Council. The three agreed that Bosnia's future is to be part of Europe, and that forces advocating ethnic hatred have no place in Bosnia. In addition, the Bosnia presidents reached agreement on what they call the "New York Declaration." A key point in the agreement is the establishment of a border service with a staff drawn equally from the three ethnic constituencies of Bosnia. Richard Holbrooke, the U-S ambassador to the United Nations, says the creation of a border service is vital to Bosnia's future as a nation.

    /// HOLBROOKE ACT ///

    You can not have a country whose borders are not patrolled by its sovereign representatives. Because of the ethnic composition of Bosnia, two of the three ethnic groups did not want well- patrolled borders or they wanted to control them themselves. So smugglers, crooks and criminal gangs could operate with impunity across an internationally recognized border. This was not only bad for the future of Bosnia, it was a giant sinkhole (problem) for Europe.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Holbrooke, who negotiated the Dayton Accords that brought peace to Bosnia, also praised the Bosnia presidents for their decision to support the creation of a single national passport. Other elements of the New York Declaration include the establishment of a permanent secretariat for the joint presidency to ensure that decisions of the presidency are properly implemented. The Bosnian presidents also agreed that the return of refugees has been too slow, especially in urban areas such as Sarajevo and Banja Luka. The Bosnian leaders will form a joint commission to establish refugee return priorities. The three members of Bosnia's presidency made their appearance at the United Nations on the eve of the fourth anniversary of the Dayton Accords. (Signed) NEB/BA/LSF/TVM/gm 15-Nov-1999 17:34 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 2234 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [08] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA (L) BY PETER HEINLEIN (MOSCOW)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256177
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Boris Yeltsin has vowed to defend Russia's military offensive in Chechnya against a chorus of international criticism at this week's European security summit in Turkey. Correspondent Peter Heinlein in Moscow reports Mr. Yeltsin will lead a large Russian delegation to the meeting.

    TEXT: President Yeltsin lashed out at Western criticism of the war in Chechnya. He told Kremlin reporters there would be no halt to the punishing military campaign as long as, in his words - a single terrorist remains on our territory. Mr. Yeltsin said he would personally lead Russia's delegation to the O-S-C-E summit beginning Thursday in Istanbul. He will be accompanied by Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, Defense Minister Igor Sergeyev, and several other senior officials, including the chief of the humanitarian effort attempting to help those fleeing the war zone. Meanwhile, international criticism of the conflict continues to mount.

    /// OPT ///

    French President Jacques Chirac is quoted as describing the Chechen campaign as a -- tragic error. U-N Secretary General Kofi Annan told Prime Minister Putin the scale of the Russian offensive seems to have gone far beyond the stated objective of flushing out -- terrorists. /// END OPT /// But in comments Sunday and Monday, Mr. Yeltsin gave his prime minister a solid vote of confidence. In broadcast remarks, the Russian leader ridiculed published reports he was about to fire Mr. Putin, and said he still favors the former spy agency chief as his successor.

    /// YELTSIN ACT -- IN RUSSIAN - FADE UNDER ///

    He says - I suggested Mr. Putin run for the presidency. There is no question of him being fired. With the O-S-C-E summit just a few days away, Russian media, the main source of information about the war, appear to have sharply curtailed their coverage. Unconfirmed reports indicate the Chechen capital, Grozny, is being heavily bombarded, possibly in preparation for a ground assault.

    /// OPT ///

    But the generals who have trumpeted the success of Russia's long-range strikes have disappeared from television screens. Instead, Army Chief of Staff Anatoly Kvashnin was shown Monday lashing out at foreign critics of the war.

    /// OPT KVASHNIN ACT -IN RUSSIAN - FADE UNDER ///

    He says -- it is Russian territory. Do they think we are a group of foreign states? We are one single indivisible Russia. /// END OPT /// While news of events inside Chechnya is scarce, the flow of refugees from the war zone is growing. The number of Chechens fleeing to neighboring regions has passed 210-thousand. E-U Foreign Affairs Representative Javier Solana was quoted (Monday) as saying the European Union is urging Russia to open Chechnya's borders to allow international humanitarian organizations access to refugees. In an interview published in a German newspaper, Mr. Solana said -- we are trying to persuade (Russia) to scale down operations and work toward a political solution because the conflict cannot be resolved militarily. (SIGNED)
    NEB/PFH/JWH/RAE 15-Nov-1999 10:21 AM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1521 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [09] EDITORIAL: TIME FOR ELECTIONS IN SERBIA

    DATE=11/16/1999
    TYPE=EDITORIAL
    NUMBER=0-08533
    CONTENT=

    THIS IS THE ONLY EDITORIAL BEING RELEASED FOR BROADCAST 11/16/99. Anncr: The Voice of America presents differing points of view on a wide variety of issues. Next, an editorial expressing the policies of the United States Government: Voice: The pressure for democratic change in Serbia is mounting. Recent polls suggest that seventy percent of Serbs want a new government. The people are tired of the corruption, arrogance and repression of the Slobodan Milosevic regime. In an effort to promote democratic change, the U.S. has announced that it will lift sanctions on Serbia if free local and national elections are held early. That could mean lifting the oil embargo and air-travel ban, among other sanctions isolating the country. U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright recently met with some members of the Serbian opposition to hear their views on additional ways to bring democratic change to Serbia. She announced U.S. support for a European-run pilot project to allow about five million dollars' worth of oil to be delivered this winter to the opposition-controlled cities of Nis [NEESH] and Pirot [PEER-rot]. The opposition is striving to bring peaceful change to Serbia. United, they have the resources to promote a platform of political and economic reform for Serbia. The people of Serbia need to know that the day they succeed in bringing democracy to their country is the day Serbia's isolation will end. Then they will be able to rejoin the mainstream of European political and economic life. Anncr: That was an editorial expressing the policies of the United States Government. If you have a comment, please write to Editorials, V-O-A, Washington, D-C, 20547, U-S-A. You may also comment at www-dot-voa-dot-gov-slash-editorials, or fax us at (202) 619-1043. 15-Nov-1999 13:49 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1849 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [10] E-U - DEFENSE (L-ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256199
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: For the first time, European Union foreign ministers have met together with European Union defense ministers to discuss the possibilities for building an E-U defense force independent of NATO. As Ron Pemstein reports from Brussels, there is a long way to go.

    TEXT: This initial meeting was to establish the political will to give the European Union its own military force capable of performing both military and civilian tasks that NATO does not want to do. There was a lot of discussion by the foreign and defense ministers to make their plans transparent to NATO since the European Union is likely for the short and medium term to need NATO's military equipment to act on its own. There were suggestions for a rapid deployment force of some 40- to 100-thousand soldiers who could quickly be assembled for some peacekeeping or humanitarian function. European Union members could decide whether or not to take part in a specific mission or whether non E-U members from NATO could participate such as Turkey or Norway. The European Union's defense coordinator, Javier Solana, says such a European force will have to be credible.

    /// SOLANA ACT ///

    What we have talked about today with the ministers of foreign affairs and defense is about how we can make this exercise as credible as possible. We want to make it credible, and in order to make it credible, we have to really put as much emphasis on capabilities for the Europeans, if we want to have capabilities for the whole range of potential crisis-management exercises or events that may come up to our attention from the pure civilian aspects to the pure military aspects and everything that is in between.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Solana has left his job as Secretary General of NATO to take responsibility for the European Union's common foreign and security policies. He plans to stay in touch with his successor at NATO, George Robertson, to coordinate the separate European force. The European foreign ministers have confirmed Mr. Solana as the new Secretary-General of the West European Union. That will give him a second job that will fold the military assets of the W-E-U into the European Union defense force. That is expected to be completed by the end of next year. By that time, the European Union will start planning the rapid deployment force that might take several more years to organize. The European Union recognized during the war in Kosovo that it did not have the transport, the satellite intelligence or precision weapons that the United States was able to mobilize. The Europeans were also slow to send soldiers to the NATO peacekeeping force in Kosovo. It is these deficiencies that they want to correct. That will require more defense spending in European countries that have been cutting military budgets for years. Finnish Foreign Minister Tarja Harlonen says the ministers are willing to make the political commitments for a separate European force but national governments have other priorities.

    /// HARLONEN ACT ///

    Let's be very realistic: Yes, I think we have the common will in that sense, but always when you mention the word "money," then remember also the ministers of finance.

    /// END ACT ///

    Easing the political difficulties is the fact that 11 of the 15 members of the European Union are also members of NATO. (Signed)
    NEB/RDP/WTW 15-Nov-1999 17:10 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 2210 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [11] E-U / CHECHNYA (L-ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256193
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: European Union foreign ministers have condemned what they call Russia's use of indiscriminate force in Chechnya. But as V-O-A Correspondent Ron Pemstein reports from Brussels, the European Union's common foreign policy is proving stronger in language than in action.

    TEXT: This was one of the first opportunities for the European Union to show its united voice in world affairs since the appointment of Javier Solana as its high representative. The rhetoric was strong -- the foreign ministers expressed deep concern at the Russian military campaign in Chechnya and condemned all disproportionate and indiscriminate use of force. As one E-U official says, "We don't condemn Russia all the time. However, the strong language in the statement is not backed by any action by the European Union or any threat of action. Instead, there is a suggestion that the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe be allowed to open a branch office in Nazran, the capital of Ingushetia, near Chechnya. Finnish Foreign Minister Tarja Harlonen, speaking for the E-U foreign ministers, says sanctions can have an uncertain effect.

    /// HARLONEN ACT ///

    If we want to stop the war now, I don't know whether only the sanctions will work. We will think about sanctions, too. The Russians know that, but they [sanctions] are not the miracle key which we will solve the issue immediately.

    /// END ACT ///

    The European Union ministers have repeatedly suggested that Russia should begin political negotiations to settle the fighting in Chechnya. Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has told the European Union Chechnya is an internal matter for Russia alone to decide. Finnish Foreign Minister Harlonen says Chechnya is proving much more difficult than the peace negotiations with Belgrade that ended the fighting in Kosovo. As for the European Union speaking with one voice on foreign policy, Mr. Solana says it will take some time.

    /// SOLANA ACT ///

    Of course, we are not going to do miracles in 24 hours, but I can tell you that today has been a very important day for the foreign and security policy of the European Union.

    /// END ACT ///

    The more important development was the first joint meeting of the European Union's foreign and defense ministers. They have been trying to work out a framework to give the European Union a separate defense capability from NATO. As a former Secretary- General of NATO, Mr. Solana is leading that effort. The foreign ministers also approved Mr. Solana's appointment as the head of the West European Union, the E-U's powerless defense arm. Mr. Solana is expected to meld the two organizations so the European Union may one day have the military capability to support the strong language of its statements. (Signed)
    NEB/RDP/JWH/WTW 15-Nov-1999 14:27 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1927 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [12] NORTHERN IRELAND (L ONLY) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (LONDON)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256179
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: In Northern Ireland, former U-S Senator George Mitchell is keeping peace hopes alive with expressions of confidence that Unionists and Republicans will break the deadlock over disarming Irish Republican Army paramilitaries. As V-O-A Correspondent Laurie Kassman reports from London, the dispute has prevented the formation of an all-party executive council to administer home rule powers.

    TEXT: Mr. Mitchell says he is confident both sides will find a way to resolve their disputes over disarming paramilitaries.

    /// MITCHELL ACT ///

    I believe the parties now understand each other's concerns and requirements far better than before and are committed to resolving the current impasse. I am increasingly confident that a way will be found to do so.

    /// END ACT ///

    The former U-S senator has been working with both sides for the past 11 weeks in a critical review of the peace process aimed at getting it back on track. The dispute has centered on the timing of the I-R-A's handover of weapons. Ulster Unionists say the I-R-A must start disarming before the I-R-A's political wing, Sinn Fein, can join an all-party executive council. Sinn Fein says the 1998 peace agreement has no such precondition. Britain cannot transfer home rule powers until the council is established. Mr. Mitchell says both sides now agree the peacetime institutions should be set up quickly. Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams says he is encouraged by Mr. Mitchell's positive assessment

    /// ADAMS ACT ///

    This review was established to resolve the crisis in the peace process by ensuring the full implementation of the Good Friday agreement in all its aspects. This is the only context for addressing outstanding issues. In short, this review and the Good Friday agreement are about making politics work.

    /// END ACT ///

    Nobody in the closed-door talks is offering details of Mr. Mitchell's suggested formula for breaking the deadlock over disarmament. Media speculation is focussing on a tightly controlled sequencing of the set-up of the all-party council and an I-R-A handover of weapons. Mr. Mitchell has also asked the special independent commission on disarmament to present its final report promptly so that both sides can issue their public reactions. Mr. Mitchell says his final review of the peace process will come after both sides make their views public on Tuesday. (Signed)
    NEB/LMK/JWH/KL 15-Nov-1999 10:32 AM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1532 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [13] NY ECON WRAP (S&L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256197
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Stock prices in the United States were modestly down today (Monday) in lackluster trading, as investors wait for Tuesday's decision on U-S interest rates. V-O-A correspondent Elaine Johanson reports from New York:

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost eight points, down a fraction, closing at 10-thousand-760. The Standard and Poor's 500 index dropped one point to 13-hundred-94. And the Nasdaq Composite Index also closed down a mere fraction. Trading was very cautious the day before the U-S central bank - the Federal Reserve Board -- decides whether to raise short-term interest rates for the third time this year. Analysts said Monday was a good time for investors to take a break, following last week's gains.

    /// BEGIN OPT ///

    Experts are still divided on what course of action the Federal Reserve Board is likely to take. Joshua Feinman, chief economist at Deutsche Asset Management, says there's a good argument for raising rates. But he believes they will remain where they are:

    /// FEINMAN ACT ///

    You can cut it either way. My own judgment is I think that's what they're going to do - hold steady, and that's a sensible course. But I certainly understand the arguments that will be made on the other side of the table: that this economy is just so robust, the labor market is so tight, that we're starting to play with fire here in terms of a possible pick-up in inflation pressure.

    /// END ACT///

    /// END OPT ///

    U-S businesses stockpiled goods in September at the fastest pace in six months. Analysts said industries are building inventories to meet rising export demand and in preparation for possible computer problems associated with the transition to the year 2000.

    /// REST OPT ///

    The inventory build-up is believed to bode well for fourth quarter profits. Leading U-S toy retailer "Toys-R-Us" reported a 55- percent jump in third-quarter earnings, based on strong sales of video game software and hardware, as well as those ubiquitous Barbie dolls. Deutsche Post, Germany's state-owned postal service, is buying U-S based Air Express International for over one billion dollars. This would make Deutsche Post the world's largest coordinator of air-freight shipments. It would also emerge as a serious challenger to Federal Express and United Parcel Service of the United States. And, in what analysts are calling the "war over Europe," British telecommunications giant Vodafone is said to be ready to make a hostile takeover bid for Mannesmann of Germany, after the German cell-phone company rebuffed Vodafone's earlier offer. The prize for Vodafone is nothing less than supremacy in Europe's de-regulating and booming mobile phone industry. (Signed) NEB/NY/EJ/LSF/GM 15-Nov-1999 16:44 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 2144 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [14] MONDAY'S EDITORIALS BY NICK SIMEONE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=11/15/1999
    TYPE=US EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11556
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Comments President Clinton made about his legacy and the Monica Lewinsky scandal -- as well as outrage over European business involvement in Sudan are drawing comment in American newspapers Monday. V- O-A's _______________ has a sampling in today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: President Clinton recently told a reporter that by standing firm and not resigning this year after his impeachment for lying about sex with an intern, he was acting to preserve the Constitution. That comment left some observers, including "The Washington Times", wondering what he meant.

    VOICE: Far from preserving the Constitution, the president subverted that very document, which he twice solemnly swore to uphold at his inaugurations. To be sure, Mr. Clinton managed to escape conviction in the Senate, owing to universal Democratic partisan support .Consider instead the sober, reflective judgement of Federal District Court Judge Susan Webber Wright, the president's former law student who fined him nearly 100-thousand dollars for his `contemptuous' conduct in the civil lawsuit brought by Paula Jones.

    TEXT: The year-long Lewinsky scandal left Washington more polarized. That led to legislative fights between the White House and Congress that many blame for the defeat of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, as well as discord over the yet to be completed federal budget. "The San Francisco Chronicle" writes that Republicans might as well throw up their hands and admit that the President has again gained the upper hand in the battle over federal dollars.

    VOICE: While Republicans had focused on the tax cut and protecting the social security surplus, Clinton had defined his priorities: "Deal with the big challenges first. Deal with the aging of America. Save social security. Save Medicare. Add a prescription drug benefit . and get America out of debt for the first time since 1835." He hardly got all he wanted, but he beat the G-O-P at its own game by making social security preservation and national debt reduction his own.

    TEXT: "The Washington Post" is criticizing European firms for wanting to take part in oil projects in Sudan, scene of one of the world's longest running civil wars and a country with one of the worst human- rights records. For some companies, a recently completed oil pipeline is making the African nation a more attractive investment. In an editorial Monday, "The Post" writes that if it were not for what it calls -- this oil-inspired softness -- an end to the country's murderous civil war might just be conceivable.

    VOICE: Western governments should present a united front in condemning Khartoum, not seize upon minor human-rights concessions as an excuse to warm relations . Europe's governments should warn their oil companies away also.

    TEXT: And finally, the Internet has proven to be a useful tool for students. But the "Sacramento (California) Bee" writes that it is also becoming an invitation for plagiarism. So much so, that the Internet now has a site that instructors can use to check the authenticity of their students' work.

    VOICE: One University of California professor snared 45 of his 320 neuro-biology students by using Plagiarism-dot-org, according to a report in the "San Francisco Chronicle". The professor . was surprised by the high number of cheaters because he had announced at the outset of the course that he would be using an Internet site to scan their papers.

    TEXT: That is a sampling of issues receiving comment in American newspapers Monday.
    NEB/NJS/RAE 15-Nov-1999 14:13 PM EDT (15-Nov-1999 1913 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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