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Voice of America, 99-11-14

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] TURKEY / QUAKE BY AMBERIN ZAMIN (ANKARA)
  • [02] TURKEY QUAKE (L-UPDATE) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (DUZCE, TURKEY)
  • [03] TURKEY - QUAKE (L-ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)
  • [04] MACEDONIA/ELECTION (L-ONLY) BY BETH POTTER (SPLIT, CROATIA)
  • [05] KOSOVO / CRASH (S) BY TIM BELAY (TIRANA)
  • [06] CLINTON - EUROPE SCENESET (L ONLY) BY DEBORAH TATE (WASHINGTON)
  • [07] CLINTON - CYPRUS (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)
  • [08] CLINTON - TURKEY (L-ONITER) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)
  • [09] GERMANY/NAZI SLAVES (L-ONLY) BY JONATHAN BRAUDE (BERLIN)

  • [01] TURKEY / QUAKE BY AMBERIN ZAMIN (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/13/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256122
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Turkish and international rescue teams are keeping up efforts to pull out hundreds of victims feared trapped under the rubble of buildings which collapsed in the aftermath of a massive earthquake which struck northwestern Turkey, Friday. From Ankara, Amberin Zaman has the details.

    TEXT: Hundreds of dazed survivors huddled in blankets around small fires in the town of Duzce as rescue workers probed mountains of rubble and twisted iron frames for signs of life. Many survivors joined rescue efforts -- pausing every now and then to burst into tears over the loss of their loved ones. The scenes were a painful reminder of the August 17th killer quake which struck the same region -- killing more than 17 thousand people. Friday's quake was centered on Duzce in Bolu province -- some 170 kilometers east of Istanbul. Lying halfway between the Istanbul and the capital, Ankara, the lush hilly province is a favorite weekend getaway for city dwellers. Fires from burst natural gas pipes continued to rage in Kaynasli, near Duzce, casting a heavy pall of grey smoke over the area. Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit ordered thousands of Turkish troops, ambulances and medical teams to the disaster zone. The government's swift response contrasts sharply with its much-criticized sluggishness in reacting to the August 17th quake. Communication lines to the area remain down making it impossible to assess the full damage wrought by the quake. Hundreds of buildings are said to have collapsed, triggering fears that the death toll may rise steeply. Still, the area affected is confined to Bolu Province with only minor damage reported elsewhere. President Clinton is expected to arrive in Turkey Sunday on a two-day official visit, which includes a trip to the Izmit area, which was among the worst affected in the August tremor. Hundreds of thousands of victims of that quake continue to shelter in flimsy tents, which are not resistant to seasonal rains. (signed)
    NEB / AZ / WD 13-Nov-1999 04:19 AM EDT (13-Nov-1999 0919 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [02] TURKEY QUAKE (L-UPDATE) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (DUZCE, TURKEY)

    DATE=11/13/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256135
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:
    /// EDS: Updates 2-256122 with new information from quake scene ///

    INTRO: Thousands of Turkish soldiers, rescue workers and survivors are searching for signs of life amid the debris after the latest massive earthquake to hit Turkey. More than 320 people are confirmed dead in the seven-point-two magnitude quake that was centered on the town of Duzce in Bolu province, about 170 kilometers east of Istanbul. Amberin Zaman files this report from the disaster zone:

    TEXT: Sometimes there were tears and other times there were loud cheers from onlookers as rescue workers dug through the debris of collapsed buildings in search of survivors. At a five-story apartment building in the Kultur neighborhood of Duzce, the news was good. Rescue workers had just dug their way through the rubble to two sisters, whose voices could be heard. They were asking for water. But elsewhere in this small town, many survivors broke down in tears as they watched the bodies of their loved ones being pulled out of the debris. Many kept vigil outside the collapsed remains of their homes, retrieving furniture and other personal items.. As night fell, they lit small fires and huddled in blankets that were distributed by thousands of soldiers sent in to the disaster zone. Unlike its reaction to the massive quake of last August that killed at least 17-thousand people, the Turkish government appears to have responded swiftly and efficiently this time. Senior Turkish officials, including Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit, rushed to the scene. Hundreds of ambulances and military helicopters were sent in to help take the injured to hospitals. Foreign rescue teams aided by sniffer dogs also were on hand, helping to locate survivors who might be buried under the rubble. Turkish officials warn that with some 200 buildings damaged or destroyed by the latest quake, the death toll could rise. Even though Bolu was among eight provinces struck by the huge quake last August, it somehow escaped extensive damage. This time, it was not so fortunate. Turkish officials say losses caused by the latest quake could total as much as 10-billion U-S dollars. (SIGNED)
    NEB/AZ/JP 13-Nov-1999 16:03 PM EDT (13-Nov-1999 2103 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] TURKEY - QUAKE (L-ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/14/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256142
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Turkish and international rescue teams are keeping up efforts to pull out survivors from beneath the wreckage of collapsed buildings in Duzce two days after a powerful earthquake struck the northwestern Turkish town and the area around it, killing nearly 400 people. Sunday morning rescuers pulled a woman from the rubble of a building, 40 hours after the quake struck. She is at least the fifth person to be rescued from this particular collapsed building in Duzce. Amberin Zaman has more from Ankara.

    TEXT: Buildings, some flattened like pancakes, others tilting precariously, may still be cocealing hundreds of bodies from Friday's killer quake. Rescue workers are fighting around the clock to pull out the lucky few who may still be alive. But freezing temperatures are making in increasingly unlikely that trapped victims can survive much longer. Turkish leaders have described Friday's quake, measuring seven point two on the Richter scale, as a major disaster. The quake came just days ahead of a two day official visit by U-S President Bill Clinton to Turkey. The President is expected to arrive in the capital Ankara late Sunday night. Turkish President Suleyman Demirel said rescue teams and soldiers stood ready at each and every scene of destruction in this panoramic province famous for its rolling green hills and gurgling streams. The province was among those struck in the devastating August earthquake, which claimed over seventeen- thousand lives, but had escaped relatively unscathed at the time. Turkish officials say around 700 buildings were either damaged or destroyed in Bolu in the latest quake. Mosques, restaurants, and highways that lay in the tremor's path crumbled and fell and split open. Harshly criticized for its feeble response to the August quake, Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit's coalition government is taking no chances this time. Thousands of Turkish troops, medical teams, rescue equipment and humanitarian supplies have been rushed to the disaster zone which remains largely confinred to Bolu province. The Turkish media which led the chorus of protest against the government's tardy reaction in August was quick to heap praise on Mr. Ecevit Sunday. The mass circulation daily Sabah described the government's efforts in banner headlines as the "resurrection of the state." (Signed) 14-Nov-1999 07:27 AM EDT (14-Nov-1999 1227 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [04] MACEDONIA/ELECTION (L-ONLY) BY BETH POTTER (SPLIT, CROATIA)

    DATE=11/14/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256145
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Voter turnout in the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia was low in Sunday's second round of the country's presidential election, although it was expected to pick up in the afternoon. More than 50- percent of the eligible voters must cast their ballots to make the result official. Beth Potter, in Split, has details.

    TEXT: International election observers reported an extremely quiet start to the presidential run-off between nationalist Social Democratic party candidate Tito Petkovski and the ruling party's candidate, Boris Trajkovski. Mr. Petkovski easily won the first round of the election two-weeks ago, taking 50-percent more votes than Mr. Trajkovski. Observers expect a winner to be announced early Monday, based on reports from the Macedonian election commissioner. Ballot counting is being watched by international observers. Analysts have said a low turnout probably would mean the more than 20-percent ethnic-Albanian minority was not taking part because there is no Albanian candidate in the run-off. Two losing Albanian candidates received about 30-percent of the vote in the first round of balloting -- enough to affect the outcome. Mr. Trajkovski, Macedonia's deputy foreign minister, is widely seen to be the more Albanian-friendly candidate, so a low turnout could hurt him. Mr. Petkovski is a former Communist-Party worker who became speaker of parliament three-years ago. Both men say they want Macedonia to join the European Union and NATO. Some voters may also be simply boycotting the polls. If fewer than 50-percent of eligible voters cast ballots, another election will be held and candidates must begin the campaign again. (SIGNED)
    NEB/BP/ALW/RAE 14-Nov-1999 09:13 AM EDT (14-Nov-1999 1413 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [05] KOSOVO / CRASH (S) BY TIM BELAY (TIRANA)

    DATE=11/13/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256125
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Officials with the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Kosovo have confirmed they have located the wreckage of the United Nations plane which crashed Friday in the northern part of the province. Tim Belay reports from the Albanian capital, Tirana.

    TEXT: Twenty-four people -- 21 passengers and a crew of three -- died in the crash. Investigators from France and Italy are reported to be on their way the area where the aircraft went down on Friday. The plane was on a routine flight from Rome to Pristina. It disappeared from radar while making its approach to land at the Pristina airport. The air service is operated by the U-N's World Food Program to allow aid materials and humanitarian aid workers to be transported more easily in this region. NATO spokesman Major Ole Irgens says the flight data recorder has been recovered from the crash site. Major Irgens says the plane appeared to have been making a normal approach to the Pristina airport when unknown problems caused it to go down. (Signed)
    NEB/TB/ALW / WD 13-Nov-1999 06:53 AM EDT (13-Nov-1999 1153 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [06] CLINTON - EUROPE SCENESET (L ONLY) BY DEBORAH TATE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=11/13/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256134
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    /// Re-running w/correct in 13th graph from text ///

    INTRO: President Clinton leaves for a 10-day, five- nation visit to Europe Sunday aimed at promoting stability in the southeastern part of the continent. The conflict in Chechnya is also expected to be high on the agenda. Correspondent Deborah Tate has a preview. Text: US officials say Mr. Clinton hopes to use his trip to make progress toward the goal of creating a unified, free and democratic Europe in the next century. While huge gains have been made toward that end since the fall of the Berlin Wall a decade ago, officials note there is still tension and turmoil in southeastern Europe. US National Security Advisor Sandy Berger:

    // Berger actuality //

    We can eliminate that zone of instability if we meet the remaining challenges - by promoting stability in the Balkans, democracy in Serbia, reconciliation in the Aegean, a settlement on Cyprus, peace in the Caucasus, and integration of Russia into the global community. Dealing with this unfinished business and strengthening our ties with key allies will be the President's top priorities.

    // end act //

    Mr. Clinton's first stop is Turkey, and the highlight will be a summit in Istanbul of the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe. US officials say the meeting is expected to update the OSCE's principles on European security, outlined in 1990 as the Cold War was ending, to take into account new crises within member countries - like those in Chechnya and Kosovo. Mr. Clinton will use the opportunity to meet with other world leaders. National Security Advisor Berger says the President is scheduled to hold talks with his Russian counterpart, Boris Yeltsin, to press US concerns about Russia's military offensive against separatist rebels in Chechnya.

    // Berger actuality //

    We have made it clear that while Russia has the right to protect its territorial integrity and fight terrorism, the indiscriminate use of force against insurgents intermingled with civilians is both wrong and counterproductive, and makes finding a solution more difficult.

    // end act //

    In addition, Mr. Berger says Mr. Clinton and Mr. Yeltsin are expected to discuss differences over US plans to develop a missile defense system, which the Russian leader has warned would be `extremely dangerous' for the arms control process. The President's visit to Turkey comes just days after a strong earthquake struck in the western part of the country, killing hundreds of people. US officials say the President's schedule will not be altered because of the quake. He will take the opportunity to visit the victims of last August's devastating earthquake during a brief stop to Izmit. Mr. Clinton will also meet with Turkish leaders to discuss efforts to resolve the Cyprus issue. The island has been divided between separate Turkish and Greek communities since 1974, when Turkish troops occupied the northern third of the island following a Greek-Cypriot coup seeking union with Greece. It is an issue the President will also discuss at his next stop, Greece. Mr. Clinton hopes an improved climate between Greece and Turkey - brought on when the two nations rushed to each others' aid after earthquakes in each country within weeks of each other - will spur progress on a resolution of the Cyprus question. His visit to Greece will be brief -curtailed because of violent anti-American demonstrations there. His next stop is Florence, Italy, to attend a conference promoting government that blends social justice with economic competitiveness. From there, the President travels to Bulgaria, where he will praise the efforts that country has made toward democratic and economic reform. His trip concludes in Kosovo, where Mr. Clinton will meet with US peacekeeping troops and assess how peace is taking hold there, five months after the end of Nato's bombing campaign that forced Serb troops from the Yugoslav province. (signed)
    NEB/DAT/PT 13-Nov-1999 15:40 PM EDT (13-Nov-1999 2040 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [07] CLINTON - CYPRUS (L) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/14/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256151
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    //// PRESIDENT TO ARRIVE IN ANKARA 4:00PM EST./////

    INTRO: President Clinton is welcoming the decision by Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash and Greek Cypriot President Glafcos Clerides to open proximity talks early next month in New York. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Ankara, where Mr. Clinton is to begin a 10-day European tour. Text: In a written statement released from Air Force One as he flew to Ankara, Mr. Clinton said the Cyprus problem would not be resolved overnight. But he said the agreement to open proximity talks offers new hope. He said the talks can bring us a step closer to a lasting peace. The talks are to begin December third under U-N auspices and without preconditions. They are aimed at paving the way for direct negotiations between the two sides. Cyprus has been divided between ethnic Turkish and Greek Cypriot communities since 1974, when Turkish troops invaded the northern third of the island following a coup by Greek Cypriots seeking to unite the island with Greece. International efforts to reunify the island have not succeeded. The last round of talks broke off two- years ago. Mr. Denktash leads the self-declared Turkish Cypriot state in northern Cyprus, which is recognized only by Turkey. The Greek Cypriot government in the south is recognized internationally as the legitimate authority for the island. The issue is expected to be high on the agenda when Mr. Clinton meets with Turkish leaders in Ankara, as well as with Greek leaders during his upcoming visit to Athens. It is also expected to be the focus of a meeting Mr. Clinton will have with U-N Secretary General Kofi Annan on the sidelines of an Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe summit later this week in Istanbul. (SIGNED) Neb/dat 14-Nov-1999 12:46 PM EDT (14-Nov-1999 1746 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [08] CLINTON - TURKEY (L-ONITER) BY DEBORAH TATE (ANKARA)

    DATE=11/14/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256155
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton has arrived in Ankara, Turkey, to begin a 10-day European visit aimed at promoting peace and stability in southeastern Europe, including in Cyprus. On his flight to the Turkish capital, Mr. Clinton learned of an agreement between Turkish and Greek Cypriot leaders to hold so-called "proximity talks" in New York early next month -- a move, he said, that could bring the divided island closer to lasting peace. Correspondent Deborah Tate reports from Ankara.

    TEXT: As he flew to Ankara aboard Air Force One (late Sunday night), Mr. Clinton was informed that Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash and Greek Cypriot President Glafcos Clerides had accepted an invitation to begin the indirect talks on December 3rd. The talks would be held under U-N auspices, with each leader sitting in a separate room as a third-party mediator shuttles between them. The talks are aimed at paving the way to a resumption of direct negotiations, which broke off two years ago. Mr. Clinton believes an improved climate between Turkey and Greece, as a result of their assistance to each other following earthquakes in both countries earlier this year, will boost the chances for progress in the Cyprus talks.

    /// 1st CLINTON ACT ///

    I think the people of both countries and, therefore, the political leaders of both countries saw each other with fresh eyes in the agonies of the earthquakes and the help that they gave each other. We've already seen some manifestation of that, and I think it is a mood, an atmosphere that needs to be acted upon.

    /// END ACT ///

    At the same time, Mr. Clinton says resolving the 25- year-old dispute will not be easy.

    /// 2ND CLINTON ACT ///

    Let me be clear: A very hard road lies ahead. The Cyprus problem has been with us for a long time -- far too long. It will not be resolved overnight. But today, we have new hope.

    /// END ACT ///

    The president's national security adviser, Sandy Berger, says the talks are expected to be substantive. A senior administration official who did not want to be identified said the talks would deal with such core issues as territory and water. In an indication of the difficulties that lie ahead, Turkish Cypriot leader Denktash late Sunday reversed course on his promise to attend the talks, because, he said, the format had changed. The talks were now intended to deal with substantive issues, he said, whereas initially they were to prepare for substantive talks. White House officials say Mr. Denktash made a commitment to take part in the talks, and they expect him to keep it. Cyprus has been divided between ethnic Turkish and Greek Cypriot communities since 1974, when Turkish troops invaded the northern third of the island, following a coup by Greek Cypriots seeking to unite the island with Greece. Mr. Denktash leads the self-declared Turkish Cypriot state in northern Cyprus, which is recognized only by Turkey, while the Greek Cypriot government in the south is recognized internationally as the legitimate authority for the island. The issue is expected to be high on the agenda when Mr. Clinton meets with Turkish leaders here in Ankara on Monday as well as with Greek leaders during his upcoming visit to Athens (on Friday). In addition, it is expected to be the focus of a meeting Mr. Clinton will have in Istanbul later this week with U-N Secretary General Kofi Annan, on the sidelines of a summit of the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe. During his European trip, Mr. Clinton will also make stops in Italy, Bulgaria, and the Yugoslav province of Kosovo. (Signed)
    NEB/DAT/WTW 14-Nov-1999 18:35 PM EDT (14-Nov-1999 2335 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [09] GERMANY/NAZI SLAVES (L-ONLY) BY JONATHAN BRAUDE (BERLIN)

    DATE=11/14/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256147
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: German industry is preparing for its next round of talks Tuesday with lawyers representing the victims of the Nazis' Second World War slave-labor program. Jonathan Braude reports from Berlin that a leading government official has told companies to dip into their strike funds.

    TEXT: German industry has been under increasing pressure to come up with more money for its share of the three-point-three-billion-dollar offer to former slaves of the Nazis. The victims' lawyers rejected the offer as insulting last month in Washington. The German government representative at the talks, Count Otto Lambsdorff, has made it clear he wants the offer raised. The government has said that if private firms increase their two-thirds share, the government will raise its own offer proportionately. But the 36-companies involved have not only refused to budge, they have also claimed it would be hard to find the sum they have offered so far. Now federal Economics Minister Werner Mueller has told the weekly news magazine "Der Spiegel" that labor unions should close the funds set aside for helping members operate during strikes. He said they should use the money to raise their offer to the slave labor fund. His comments have been welcomed by the victims' lawyers as a real improvement in the tone of the discussion, but industry spokesmen have rejected it. Spokesman Uwe Mazura objects to the proposal on legal grounds. He says the funds were set up and registered for a specific purpose and could not simply be diverted into something entirely different. Victims' lawyer Michael Witti, who is asking for compensation amounting to at least three-times the offer on the table, said he thought Mr. Mueller was deliberately stepping up the pressure. He did not think the minister's proposal was workable in itself, but he told the "Berliner Morgenpost" newspaper it showed the government recognized industry's stance is damaging Germany's image. He said he believed German companies could find plenty of money elsewhere -- if they wanted to. (SIGNED)
    NEB/JB/ALW/RAE 14-Nov-1999 10:33 AM EDT (14-Nov-1999 1533 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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