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Voice of America, 99-12-02

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] U-N-CYPRUS TALKS (L-ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)
  • [02] U-N BALKANS (L-ONLY) BY LISA SCHLEIN (GENEVA)
  • [03] NATO / KOSOVO (L ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)
  • [04] NATO DEFENSE MINISTERS (L ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)
  • [05] RUSSIA - NATO BY ANDRE DE NESNERA (WASHINGTON)
  • [06] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA (L-ONLY) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)
  • [07] NORTHERN IRELAND HOME RULE(L) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (LONDON)
  • [08] NORTHERN IRELAND 3RD UPDATE (S-ONLY) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (LONDON)
  • [09] CLINTON-NORTHERN IRELAND (L-ONLY) BY DAVID GOLLUST (SEATTLE)
  • [10] WTO (L) BY AMY BICKERS (SEATTLE)
  • [11] CLINTON-WORLD TRADE (L) BY DAVID GOLLUST (SEATTLE)
  • [12] CLINTON-WTO (L) BY DAVID GOLLUST (SEATTLE)
  • [13] THE BATTLE IN SEATTLE - W-T-O STIRS DISSENT BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [14] NY ECON WRAP (S & L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)
  • [15] THURSDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

  • [01] U-N-CYPRUS TALKS (L-ONLY) BY BRECK ARDERY (UNITED NATIONS)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256774
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    /// EDS: CYPRUS TALKS BEGIN ABOUT 1500 UTC FRIDAY ///

    INTRO: United Nations-sponsored talks on the future of Cyprus begin Friday at U-N headquarters in New York. V-O-A Correspondent Breck Ardery reports.

    TEXT: Cypriot President Glafcos Clerides and Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash are holding so-called "proximity talks," expected to last about two weeks. "Proximity talks" mean the two leaders will not meet face-to-face, but will hold separate discussions with U-N Secretary-General Kofi Annan or Alvaro de Soto, an assistant secretary-general and special adviser on Cyprus. Mr. De Soto told reporters there will be a news blackout during the talks, but the Secretary-General will likely issue a statement after the talks are over. Mr. De Soto says Mr. Annan is hopeful the discussions will deal with matters of substance.

    /// DE SOTO ///

    It is very much the Secretary-General's hope they will address the core issues that underlie the Cyprus question. In his view, they include security, distribution of powers, property and territory. There are a number of other issues, of course, but you can cluster them in these four subjects.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. De Soto said the Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders have agreed the talks are meant to prepare the ground for "meaningful negotiations leading to a comprehensive settlement." The U-N official believes it is very unlikely that this round of talks will result in any agreements on major issues. Even so, the U-N Security Council is encouraged by the fact that the talks are taking place. Jeremy Greenstock of Britain read a statement on behalf of the Council.

    /// GREENSTOCK ACT ///

    The Council has stated repeatedly that the status quo on Cyprus is unacceptable. Council members welcome the start of proximity talks to prepare the ground for meaningful negotiations leading to a comprehensive settlement. The Council hopes that all concerned will participate in the talks without pre-conditions, and in a constructive spirit.

    /// END ACT ///

    Cyprus has been split into the Turkish north and the Greek south for 25 years, with U-N peacekeeping forces maintaining a cease-fire between the two communities. In a recent report to the Security Council, U-N Secretary-General Kofi Annan recommended a six-month renewal of the peacekeeping mission in Cyprus. The United Nations' goal is to reunite Cyprus, with some degree of autonomy for the island's Greek and Turkish communities. (Signed) NEB/BA/LSF/TVM/WTW 02-Dec-1999 17:52 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 2252 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [02] U-N BALKANS (L-ONLY) BY LISA SCHLEIN (GENEVA)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256758
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: A senior United Nations official and Balkans expert warns that future conflicts in the Balkans are unavoidable. Lisa Schlein in Geneva reports the official is criticizing Western countries for their lack of long-range vision and plans to stabilize the region.

    TEXT: United Nations Under-Secretary General, Jacques Paul Klein, has been Coordinator of U-N Operation in Bosnia-Herzegovina for the past two years. He says he believes the majority of people in the Balkans are looking for a better, more normal future. But, he adds, the leaders remain hard-line nationalists who only are interested in retaining power at the expense of their peoples' welfare. Mr. Klein says prospects for the rule of law and for democracy in the region will be bleak as long as the Balkans remains a haven for war criminals. He says the prospect of further border changes through violent inter-ethnic struggles cannot be ruled out.

    /// 1st KLEIN ACT ///

    The consequences for the Europe of the future are incalculable. If this is to be prevented, it requires an intensive long-term international engagement throughout the region. An early exit strategy for the international community is not a sensible option, not a viable option and will lead to disaster.

    /// END ACT ///

    Jacques Paul Klein says the international community has no clear idea about how to pursue peace in the Balkans. He says local communities are aware of this, but they are superficially playing along and biding their time until Western interest withers away. Mr. Klein says he's concerned that the international community is focusing almost exclusively on Kosovo and paying little attention to Montenegro, which he considers a potential powder keg. In regard to Bosnia, Mr. Klein says the relative stability of the past three years masks a fundamental fragility of the security situation. He says there are real prospects for a resurgence of violence.

    /// 2nd KLEIN ACT///

    There are still three ethnically distinct armies. The territorial ambitions of the hard- line elements of each party remain unrequited. These parties seek to consolidate and expand wartime gains through other means, and to strategically position their supporters for renewal of hostilities.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Klein says he is concerned that the decision to reduce United Nations peacekeeping forces in Bosnia by a third is short-sighted, and may be sending the wrong political message. He adds regional instability is hampering efforts to achieve peace in Bosnia. (Signed)
    NEB/LS/GE/WTW 02-Dec-1999 12:32 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1732 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [03] NATO / KOSOVO (L ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256768
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The NATO commander in Kosovo has asked alliance defense ministers to make sure that teachers and other civil servants in the province get their pay. Correspondent Ron Pemstein reports from NATO Headquarters in Brussels.

    TEXT: General Klaus Reinhardt says the problem is not pledges to pay the salaries of teachers and power plant operators in Kosovo. The problem is to turn those pledges into cash.

    /// REINHARDT ACT ///

    This was one of the key things that I tried to tell the ministers today, that this could affect the security if people get frustrated because, as our Albanian friends here know, there are many people who have been working since June without having been paid. They work hard and they expect to get money for the teachers, the professors and the others.

    /// END ACT ///

    Donors have pledged two-billion dollars to meet Kosovo's needs through the end of next year. But General Reinhardt complains bureaucratic obstacles have prevented that money from reaching Kosovo's civil servants. The Kosovo commander has told NATO defense ministers they must make sure the pledges are actually paid. Defense Secretary William Cohen says General Reinhardt's message will be passed on.

    /// COHEN ACT ///

    Much of the money is tied up in bureaucratic pipelines. And what he was trying to do was to make sure that all the members understood this so that they and we could go back to other agencies and to put as much pressure as we could to free those monies up and secure the pledges that have been made to actually produce the money for the reconstruction aid and the rehabilitation in Kosovo.

    /// END ACT ///

    Another problem is getting enough police officers to patrol the streets in Kosovo. There are 18-hundred civilian police where the requirement is for more than four-thousand. General Reinhardt says if there were more police, his 50-thousand NATO troops could cover more territory in Kosovo. Despite continuing ethnic violence, General Reinhardt says crime in Kosovo is down.

    /// REINHARDT ACT ///

    I think in this regard we are much safer today than we were about two-months ago. And just to give you a comparison, we tried to count the criminal acts per thousand, per hundred-thousand inhabitants in this regard. We are, in a good European structure, we are a little worse than in Berlin and in this regard we are not doing so badly.

    /// END ACT ///

    One of the signs of a more peaceful environment is the increase in the number of Serbs returning to Kosovo. General Reinhardt says NATO has escorted hundreds of Serbs back to southern and eastern areas of the province, not only to the northern parts near Serbia proper. NATO estimates that 90-thousand to 100- thousand ethnic Serbs live in Kosovo. Half of General Reinhardt's troops are engaged in the protection of Kosovo's minorities. (SIGNED)
    NEB/RDP/JWH/RAE 02-Dec-1999 14:07 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1907 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [04] NATO DEFENSE MINISTERS (L ONLY) BY RON PEMSTEIN (BRUSSELS)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256769
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: NATO Defense Ministers have discussed plans to build up European defense as well as the U-S proposal for a limited ballistic missile defense. V-O-A Correspondent Ron Pemstein at NATO headquarters reports U-S Defense Secretary William Cohen faced questions from the allies about what the Clinton Administration has in mind.

    TEXT: If the United States decides to go ahead with a limited missile defense, it will need support from NATO allies such as Britain and Denmark that will have to upgrade their radars to track the rogue missiles that might be fired. U-S Secretary of Defense William Cohen says such questions are premature until the United States decides next year whether it wants to build the limited missile defense. The European allies want to be consulted about the U-S talks with the Russians about missile defense and they confronted the Defense Secretary with a variety of questions.

    /// COHEN ACT ///

    They have raised issues about their deterrent, issues of de-coupling - also about whether this would be something that they might be interested in themselves and this is some kind of technology that perhaps the European nations might be interested in as well. So we covered the full panoply of issues. The United States would have to have the support of our allies for an effective system. We believe it is important that we discuss the issue with them about the nature of the threat.

    /// END ACT ///

    The United States maintains that countries such as North Korea and Iran could threaten Europe as well as U-S territory with long-range missiles. At the same time, the limited missile defense system is not envisioned to protect U-S territory against thousands of Russian missiles.

    /// COHEN ACT ///

    This is something of a very limited nature. It is designed to deal with rogue states. It is not directed against the Russians or others, and it would not undercut the Russian strategic deterrent and this is something that we have to make very clear. The Russians have many thousands of nuclear weapons which we are trying to reduce in START-Two and hopefully going on to START-Three. And so this in no way would undercut that strategic deterrent capability they have and that really in essence is what I have tried to lay out for the members today.

    /// END ACT ///

    Also at the meeting, NATO's secretary general, George Robertson, criticized the European allies for not contributing enough to their own defense in the future.

    /// ROBERTSON ACT ///

    We need troops which are trained, equipped, and ready for actual use, not just forces which exist on paper alone. These troops have to be mobile, sustainable, and survivable, and backed up by the best command and control and intelligence.

    /// END ACT ///

    The European allies had trouble finding enough troops to go to Kosovo for peacekeeping. European leaders will decide next week to form a 50-thousand to 60- thousand soldier rapid reaction force. NATO supports the concept, noting that this force would comprise only two percent of the one-point-eight-million soldiers already in European armies.(Signed)
    NEB/RDP/JWH/JP 02-Dec-1999 14:52 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1952 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [05] RUSSIA - NATO BY ANDRE DE NESNERA (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=BACKGROUND REPORT
    NUMBER=5-44893
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:
    // Eds: This is the fifth in an eight-part series on Russia. Issues raised in the series include the role of the I-M-F, corruption, and Boris Yeltsin's legacy.
    //

    INTRO: Relations between Russia and the West cannot be described as "warm." Many analysts say they have deteriorated in the past few years. In the fifth of an eight-part series on Russia, former V-O-A Moscow correspondent Andre de Nesnera looks at the "cooling of relations," especially in the wake of NATO's bombing campaign against Yugoslavia.

    TEXT: One of the major - and some might add unforeseen consequences of the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991, was that from one day to the next, Moscow lost its super-power status. During the days of the cold war, Moscow shared the international spotlight with Washington. For decades, international relations were dominated by what was known as a "bipolar world": a world where decisions by the United States, on the one hand, and the Soviet Union, on the other, affected many nations. But this is no longer the case. And many Russians - from ordinary citizens to politicians - describe this loss of international prestige and clout in terms of humiliation. They believe the West - led by the United States - can do whatever it wants on the world stage and treats Russia like a third-world nation. And that has created a lot of resentment in many parts of Russia. Western leaders - including President Bill Clinton - have made clear they still consider Russia a major player on the world scene. But many analysts say relations between Moscow and the West - especially the United States - have deteriorated since the heady days right after the fall of communism. They say two recent examples: NATO's expansion eastward and its bombing campaign in Kosovo - against Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic - have not helped matters one bit. Former U-S National Security Adviser General Brent Scowcroft says during the recent Kosovo crisis, the West did not use Moscow's traditional ties with Serbia in an effective way. Instead, he says the United States has shunned Russia.

    /// SCOWCROFT ACT ///

    We do not mean to do it. But I believe we are behaving toward them in a way that accentuates their sense of humiliation that they have as a result of the end of the Cold War. And we seem to ignore them, unless we need them for some particular thing. I think it is a very bad way to go. And I think it is giving rise to a strong nationalistic sentiment that is both anti-US and anti-Western.

    /// END ACT ///

    NATO Secretary-General George Robertson admits relations between the alliance and Moscow are strained. But he says Russian officials - especially former Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin - played an important role in ending the Kosovo crisis and that Russian soldiers now have a stabilizing role in the region.

    /// ROBERTSON ACT ///

    Moscow broke off relations with NATO when the air assaults took place on Yugoslavia (campaign began March 24th - ended June 9th), although they played a big part in the diplomacy beforehand and they were instrumental in helping end the conflict. Since then we have started up discussions about Kosovo and Bosnia only again. But the reality is, that on the ground inside Kosovo, Russian troops and NATO troops are working closely, side by side, in the interest of bringing stability and peace back to that troubled part of the Balkans.

    /// END ACT ///

    Militarily, NATO-Russian cooperation is progressing smoothly in the Balkans. But the political relationship remains frozen. Many analysts wonder what will unblock the situation and set Moscow and NATO back on the right track that began in May 1997 with the signing of the "NATO-Russia Founding Act." The groundbreaking document established a pattern of cooperation that was simply unthinkable just ten years ago. Jack Matlock - the last American ambassador to the Soviet Union - says the West must learn from the Kosovo crisis.

    /// MATLOCK ACT //

    We should have been much more careful on the diplomatic front in keeping Russia as more of a partner in solving international crises, instead of pushing them aside and then constantly getting into debates with them. I think we could have done more there.

    /// END ACT ///

    Experts expect very little will happen next year to change the current state of relations between Moscow and the West - and between Moscow and NATO. That is because Russia and the United States hold presidential elections - times when traditionally, relations have been put "on hold." Analysts say only when new administrations in both countries are firmly in place can the full-scale relationship resume in earnest. (Signed)
    NEB/ADEN/KL 02-Dec-1999 14:19 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1919 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [06] RUSSIA / CHECHNYA (L-ONLY) BY EVE CONANT (MOSCOW)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256754
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Russian military officials say Chechen militants have set up strong defenses in the capital, Grozny, and are fighting Russian troops in two towns near the city. Russia's foreign minister, meanwhile, says Moscow will not let the West dictate when the head of the Organization for Security and Cooperation (O-S-C-E) in Europe will be allowed to visit Chechnya. V-O-A Moscow correspondent Eve Conant reports.

    TEXT: For days, Russian artillery and warplanes have been bombarding Argun, a small town five kilometers east of the Chechen capital, Grozny. Rebel fighters in Argun are putting up some of the strongest resistance to federal troops since the start of Moscow's military offensive. Russian General Gennady Troshev, however, says fighting in eastern regions has been successful.

    /// Troshev Act in Russian in full and fade under ///
    "As a result of fighting there," he says, "more than 100 rebels were killed. This time," he adds, "they left at least 40 bodies behind them." Russian television broadcast pictures of what military officials say are dozens of Chechen fighters killed in the latest fighting. General Troshev says Russian forces will continue their offensive despite an increased number of violent clashes with Chechen militants.
    /// Troshev Act in Russian in full and fade under ///
    "Our strategy is simple. If they shoot at us from a house, we destroy the house," he says. "If they shoot from all over a village, we destroy the village." Military sources say thousands of Chechen fighters are well entrenched in Grozny. Russian news agencies report Russian warplanes have been dropping high explosive bombs on the city, while Chechen fighters in Argun and nearby Urus-Martan are fighting back with large supplies of anti-aircraft guns, grenade launchers and small arms. Meanwhile, there is little sign that international observers or humanitarian groups will be able to enter the region any time soon. In Moscow, Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov told reporters that Russia would not let the West dictate the timing of a visit to Chechnya by O-S-C-E chief Knut Vollebaek. Earlier this week, Mr. Vollebaek visited to Moscow to arrange the trip, but Russian officials would not set a date for his group to visit the breakaway republic. (Signed)
    NEB/EC/GE/JP 02-Dec-1999 10:43 AM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1543 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [07] NORTHERN IRELAND HOME RULE(L) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (LONDON)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256648
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Britain has officially transferred home rule powers to Northern Ireland. In the next step of the process, the Irish Republic in the south has revised its constitution to drop reference to any hostile claims to Ulster province. V-O-A Correspondent Laurie Kassman reports from London that now it is up to the Irish Republican Army (I-R-A) to name its representative to cooperate with the special commission on disarmament.

    TEXT: Irish Prime Minister Bertie Ahern has fulfilled his part of the peace deal for Northern Ireland with a signature on the revised constitution. The new text drops any hostile claims to the north. The act follows Britain's handover of home rule powers to Belfast.

    /// AHERN ACT ///

    We now have a framework within which profound differences can be accommodated on the basis of consent and growing friendship. We have lived for too long with the consequences of the failures of the past. We can now move into the new future, rich in the promise of peace, partnership and prosperity.

    /// END ACT ///

    Prime Minister Ahern also has signed the documents setting up six cross-border committees to deal with issues of mutual concern as outlined in the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement. Britain's Secretary for Northern Ireland, Peter Mandelson, has called it the dawn of a new era for Northern Ireland.

    /// MANDELSON ACT ///

    All the people of this island have had a chance to express their view, to choose division or agreement. Overwhelmingly they chose agreement, consent and peace over division, coercion and violence.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Mandelson has seen his duties sharply reduced now that responsibility for most of Northern Ireland's daily administration has been passed to the Belfast government. But Britain will retain direct control over taxation and security matters.

    /// REST OPT ///

    The next step of the carefully sequenced peace plan calls for the Irish Republican Army to name its representative who will work with the special disarmament commission. Paramilitaries are expected to hand over their weapons by May of next year, as required by the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement. The timing of the I-R-A disarmament had stalled the establishment of the all-party cabinet, which now includes two members of the I-R-A's political wing. The cabinet was officially set up on Monday, opening the way for the British parliament to transfer home rule powers to Belfast - ending 25 years of direct rule. The headline of the Irish Times Thursday summed up the buoyant mood on the island. It read simply: "Power to the People." (Signed) NEB/LMK/GE/gm 02-Dec-1999 07:00 AM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1200 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [08] NORTHERN IRELAND 3RD UPDATE (S-ONLY) BY LAURIE KASSMAN (LONDON)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256777
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Northern Ireland's new power-sharing cabinet held its first meeting Thursday after Britain transferred home rule powers to it. Earlier in the day the Irish Republic added its contribution to the peace process by revoking its territorial claims on the north. VOA Correspondent Laurie Kassman reports the Irish Republican Army now has named an intermediary to discuss an eventual weapons handover.

    TEXT: The I-R-A kept its promise and -- with only a few hours left to the historic day - named the envoy who will cooperate with the international disarmament commission. The commssion is mandated by the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement to supervise the disarming of Northern Ireland's paramilitaries. The I-R-A announcement was the latest step in a carefully sequenced formula that included the establishment of Northern Ireland's all-party 12 minister cabinet. Then the British parliament transferred home rule powers to Belfast. And, just hours before the ministers held their first meeting on Thursday, the Irish Republic revoked its 62-year territorial claim on the north. The historic day was slightly marred when two ministers from the Democratic Union Party boycotted the first cabinet meeting. The radical protestant party refuses to share power with the I-R-A's political wing until the I-R-A disarms. (SIGNED)
    NEB/PT 02-Dec-1999 17:45 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 2245 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [09] CLINTON-NORTHERN IRELAND (L-ONLY) BY DAVID GOLLUST (SEATTLE)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256770
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton, who has been heavily involved in the pursuit of peace in Northern Ireland, is welcoming the creation of a power-sharing government there and promising continued U-S support for implementation of the 1998 Good Friday peace accord. V-O-A's David Gollust reports from Seattle.

    TEXT: The President counts himself among the millions of Americans of Irish ancestry, and has made peace in Northern Ireland one of his top foreign-policy priorities. He has made two trips to Belfast, and his special envoy for Northern Ireland, former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, was instrumental in the diplomacy of recent weeks that finally produced a power-sharing arrangement between Protestants and Roman Catholics. Speaking during a ceremony in Seattle at which he signed a convention against child labor, Mr. Clinton said the promise of peace and hope raised by the Good Friday agreement 18 months ago is now being realized:

    /// CLINTON ACT ///

    The people of Northern Ireland now have the power to shape their own destiny and choose their own future. Democratic government by and for all the people of Northern Ireland is now replacing suspicion, fear and violence. It is now possible to believe that the day of the gun and the bomb are, in fact, over.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Clinton congratulated the Northern Ireland politicians involved in the peace process, along with British Prime Minister Tony Blair and his Irish Republic counterpart Bertie Ahern. He said remaining terms of the Good Friday accord must be implemented in full, and that the United States must -- and will -- continue to stand with all those who are unequivocally committed to the pursuit of peace. The President later told reporters he wants to pay yet another visit to Northern Ireland; he would not confirm speculation that the trip might come later this month. (Signed)
    NEB/DAG/WTW 02-Dec-1999 14:56 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1956 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [10] WTO (L) BY AMY BICKERS (SEATTLE)

    DATE=12/1/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256738
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Protestors and police clashed in (the Pacific Northwest city of) Seattle Wednesday for the second day running, with police arresting at least 450 people and resorting to tear gas and pepper spray to breakup crowds. As Amy Bickers reports from Seattle, the focus of the demonstrators' wrath, the World Trade Organization meeting, continued with a call from President Clinton for officials to listen to the public's views.

    TEXT:

    /// PROTEST NOISE UP FOR :04 AND UNDER ///

    Hundreds of demonstrators hit downtown Seattle Wednesday for the second day in a row, defying police orders to stay away from the main venues of the World Trade Organization meeting.

    /// MORE PROTEST NOISE UP FOR :04 AND UNDER ///

    Police took a much more assertive stance than they did on Tuesday, when more than 40-thousand protestors filled Seattle's streets. They confiscated gas masks and arrested anyone who refused orders to disperse. For the second day, they fired tear gas, pepper spray and plastic pellets at crowds of anti-W-T-O activists and enforced an all-night curfew. President Clinton, who addressed trade ministers from the 135 W-T-O members, reaffirmed his view that the demonstrators' concerns need to be made part of the W-T-O policy-making process.

    /// CLINTON ACT ///

    The sooner the W-T-O opens up the process and lets people representing those who are outside in, the sooner we will see fewer demonstrations, more constructive debate and a broader level of support in every country for the direction that every single person in this room knows that we out to be taking into the 21st century.

    /// END ACT ///

    European officials also said that issues such as human rights and labor conditions should be part of the dialogue. But officials from some developing countries, including Bangladesh, said Washington and Europe were using the protests to promote their own trade agendas. Developing nations say that if such conditions are woven into trade agreements their economies will suffer. Television sets around Seattle's convention center featured all-day local news programs showing endless nearby scenes of protestors sparring with police. Despite the tension, the trade meetings went on as scheduled, with officials and delegates fighting their own battles over trade barriers in agriculture, industrial goods, intellectual property rights and other areas. On the meeting's first day, massive protests forced the cancelation of opening ceremonies. On Wednesday, W-T-O officials announced the cancellation of some social events, including a delegates' reception and several theatrical performances. At the end of the day, U-S Trade Representative Charlene Barshevsky told reporters that she was confident that a new round of trade liberalization would be launched at the end of the conference.

    /// BARSHEVSKY ACT ///

    I do think we are very much on track substantively and in terms of the work effort as I have been saying in several ways that we will be launching a new round on Friday with a very balanced and positive and forward leading agenda.

    /// END ACT ///

    Other participants expressed doubts. Officials from some developing nations say some countries are so opposed to U-S efforts to put labor conditions on the the World Trade Organization's agenda that they may walk out of the talks. (SIGNED)
    NEB/AB/PLM 01-Dec-1999 23:25 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 0425 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [11] CLINTON-WORLD TRADE (L) BY DAVID GOLLUST (SEATTLE)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256763
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton has signed the International Labor Organization treaty banning the most severe forms of child labor. The measure was signed on the sidelines of the World Trade Organization meeting. Correspondent David Gollust reports from Seattle the President has been pressing for labor protections in world trade agreements.

    TEXT: Labor union activists - allies of the President's Democratic Party - have been the core of the massive street protests against the W-T-O. While condemning the violent minority among the protestors, Mr. Clinton has at every occasion stressed that the W- T-O must take labor concerns into account in its efforts to launch a new round of global trade negotiations. In his last scheduled event in Seattle, Mr. Clinton signed the international convention against child labor, aimed at eliminating labor abuses that he said shock the conscience and haunt the soul.

    /// CLINTON ACT ///

    Children brutalized by the nightmare of prostitution, children endentured to manufacturers working against debt for wages so low that they will never be repaid. Children who must handle dangerous chemicals or who are forced to sell illegal drugs. Children who crawl deep into unsafe mines. Children who are forcibly recruited into armed conflicts, and then spend the rest of their entire lives bearing the scars of committing murder when they were eight or nine or 10-years old.

    /// END ACT ///

    The Convention was adopted by the International Labor Organization in Geneva in June and ratified by the U-S Senate last month. The treaty calls for immediate action by signatories to stop a long list of abusive labor practices involving children under age 18 and to ensure access to free education. The United States - which already has broad array of child labor laws - is only the third country, along with Malawi and the Seychelles, to adopt the accord. But ratification efforts are underway in scores of other countries. The I-L-O estimates that at least 250-million children between the ages of five and 14 are working in developing nations and tens-of-millions under exploitive and harmful conditions. Mr. Clinton tied administration support for the child labor convention to his drive at the W-T-O to, in his words "put a human face" on the globalization of world trade. He says the next round of world-trade negotiations should not just lower tariff barriers, but seek to raise the quality of life with enforceable core labor standards and environmental safeguards. (SIGNED)
    NEB/DAG/RAE 02-Dec-1999 13:40 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1840 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [12] CLINTON-WTO (L) BY DAVID GOLLUST (SEATTLE)

    DATE=12/1/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256734
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: President Clinton is condemning the violent demonstrators who disrupted Tuesday's opening of the World Trade Organization conference in Seattle. But he also says the WTO must become more transparent and responsive to legitimate critics, if it is to achieve the goal of freer global trade. VOA's David Gollust reports from Seattle.

    TEXT: The conference attracted tens of thousands of anti-WTO demonstrators including a small minority who went on a window-smashing and looting rampage through downtown Seattle Tuesday night. The violence, quelled by riot police firing teargas and plastic pellets, was an embarrassment to local authorities and to the President, who condemned the disturbances in various appearances here. But Mr. Clinton also portrayed the broader demonstrations as a healthy sign of public interest in a subject that had been the exclusive domain of heads of state, trade ministers and business executives. In a keynote address to the more than 130 trade ministers, Mr. Clinton said those marching outside the conference hall are unsure that the W-T-O is working for them, and want their voices to be heard:

    ///Clinton act///

    What they are telling us in the streets here is that this was an issue we used to silent on. We're not going to be silent on it anymore. We haven't necessarily given up on trade. But we want to be heard. The sooner the WTO opens up the process and lets people representing those who are outside in, the sooner we will see fewer demonstrations, more constructive debate, and a broader level of support in every country for the direction that every single person in this room know that we ought to be taking into the 21st century.

    ///end act///

    The protestors included labor and environmental activists who are key supporters of the President's Democratic party. And he outlined a U-S agenda for the global trade negotiations likely to be agreed upon here includes environmental safeguards and protection for workers' rights. Mr. Clinton also wants to keep burgeoning trade on the Internet free from tariffs and to see a reduction of farm subsidies in Europe, Japan and elsewhere seen as discriminatory to American agricultural products. European countries are resisting imports of genetically-modified U-S farm goods, though they already make up a large portion of the domestic American market. Administration officials have dismissed European fears about the products as irrational and protectionist. And in remarks to Seattle food exporters, the President issued a ringing defense of such products:

    ///Clinton actiuality two///

    We should maintain market access based on sound science. I want to say to the people of Europe and all around the world: I would never knowingly permit a single pound of any American food product to leave this country if I had a shred of evidence that it was unsafe. And neither would any farmer in the Uniuted States of America. (applause)

    ///end actuality///

    Mr. Clinton rounded out his schedule Wednesday with meetings with leaders of groups critical of W-T-O policies including AFL-CIO Labor Federation leader John Sweeney. Before leaving Seattle Thursday, he signs the new International Labor Organization convention that outlaws some of the most severe forms of child labor world wide. (Signed)
    NEB/DAG/PT

    ///end act///

    Mr. Clinton 01-Dec-1999 20:05 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 0105 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [13] THE BATTLE IN SEATTLE - W-T-O STIRS DISSENT BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=WORLD OPINION ROUNDUP
    NUMBER=6-11577
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: Visions of club-wielding Seattle, Washington police battling protestors amid clouds of tear gas and pepper spray have been appearing in newspapers around the world for the past few days. Now, the world's press is reacting to the violent demonstrations in the northwest U-S city where the World Trade Organization is holding a conference. We get a sampling now from __________ in this week's World Opinion Roundup.

    TEXT: Unexpectedly violent protests by a small percentage of the tens of thousands of people who crowded into Seattle made news in cities around the globe. The demonstrations found some support as many European dailies agree that their arguments are "partially right and partially foolish." A French newspaper says the "cacophony" created in the streets is "a positive sign ... that the people have their say in what is happening and the experts ... do not have a monopoly on the future. In Asia, many editorials columns criticized the W-T-O as an organization promoting an "international trading regime [that] is still far from ... fair." One Malaysian commentator went so far as to say the demonstrators represented "the human face at the receiving end of trade decisions by bureaucrats ..." ... In some other countries, commentators focused on the need for having better rules to govern world trade. We begin our sampling in China's special administrative region, Hong Kong, where The Hong Kong Standard editorial suggests:

    VOICE: The present international trading regime is still far from open, free and fair... The very biggest markets - the United States, the EU (European Union) and Japan - all enjoy large areas of protection, direct and indirect. In addition, there are dangers from unbridled capitalism that has no respect for the environment.

    TEXT: Across town, The South China Morning Post echoed the words of some other newspapers with this assessment.

    VOICE: Increased world trade, properly regulated, will eventually benefit everyone, including poorer nations. But breaking down trade barriers and creating free competition also generates many problems, especially for developing nations. The pressing question is how these difficulties can be lessened and how concerned groups can be given a voice before their frustration creates scenes like those witnessed in Seattle.

    TEXT: The New Straits Times in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, suggests the protestors, rather than crackpots, "represent the human face at the receiving end of trade decisions by bureaucrats..." And in Singapore, the Business Times argues that "Study after study has shown it is the developing countries that will be the biggest beneficiaries of a new round of tariff cuts." Turning to India, The Economic Times in Bombay suggests:

    VOICE: Whatever the outcome of the ministerial talks at Seattle, one thing is certain. Non-governmental organizations ... have become a force to contend with, not only domestically but also internationally.

    TEXT: In the Middle East, Israel's Yediot Aharonot of Tel-Aviv ran an analysis, noting:

    VOICE: Most of the arguments advanced by the anti-W- T-O protesters in Seattle do not hold water [Editors: "are invalid."] Free international trade does benefit the world. It generates and sustains growth and fair economic practices.

    TEXT: Meanwhile, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the widely available Al-Sharq Al-Awsat suggests:

    VOICE: The protestors forced President Clinton and his secretary of state to acknowledge that the protestors have a message which must be respected... No one can resist trends towards globalization because these (trends) represent the natural development of mankind's activities. ... However ... the meeting in Seattle must remember that any agreements must take into consideration the interests of ... developing nations.

    TEXT: In this hemisphere, the big Mexican daily, El Norte in Monterrey, sees the situation as so complicated it says:

    VOICE: Commercial problems among countries, far from decreasing are increasing, which makes it necessary to have clear rules, a mediator and a forum in which to discuss calmly any conflict. In the immediate future, we will have to fight for a more humane trade liberalization that can take into account the negative consequences that might result for those not prepared to face such liberalization ...

    TEXT: From Havana, the communist party daily Granma adds this caution:

    VOICE: ... free trade, financial deregulation, and trans-nationalization, are concepts that sound good, but they cannot be applied in an unjust and unequal world without deep and extensive measures of compensation.

    TEXT: This is how Nigeria's Comet sees the situation from Lagos:

    VOICE: There is no way the new W-T-O liberalization package, which European Commission economists suggest would generate an annual gain of 400-billion-dollars for the world economy, will not impact positively on developing countries which do the right thing now... The New World Trade Order is raring to go with those who can move in tandem with it.

    TEXT: Still in Africa, Cameroon, Yaounde's bilingual weekly, L'Action, suggests that the challenge of the W-T-O is to:

    VOICE: . humanize the rules of global trade and take into account the disparities in development levels ... despite the disparities. It is obvious that the globalization phenomenon is irreversible ...

    TEXT: And rounding out the commentary, we have these thoughts from Europe, beginning in London, where Britain's Financial Times editorialized:

    VOICE: The question is how much can be rescued from the chaos ... The E-U and the United States are still at loggerheads, and are still intent on bullying developing countries, without offering much in return. This way lies deadlock. Strenuous efforts are needed to explain to the demonstrators outside ... that trade liberalization benefits rich and poor countries alike.

    TEXT: In Paris, the business companion to the well- known daily, Le Figaro - called Le Figaro Economie - says:

    VOICE: The goals set for the conference are very ambitious when one knows how divided the ministers are. They disagree on practically every point ... The White House document is truly a war machine against Europe... The United States wants to reap the benefits before it has planted any seeds ... but Europe will resist.

    TEXT: And lastly, from Germany's financial capital, The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, criticizes what it says is President Clinton's chameleon-like change of philosophies to suit the political situation.

    VOICE: What is President Clinton doing, in view of the great willingness of militant opponents to the W- T-O and globalization to use violence? He, who used to give the world lectures on the advantages of open markets, is presenting himself as a conciliator, showing understanding for the concerns of the protestors ... This is the politician Clinton who listens to the moods and adds them up to votes...

    TEXT: On that note, we conclude this sampling of comment from the world press on the W-T-O conference in Seattle.
    NEB/ANG/JP 02-Dec-1999 17:27 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 2227 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [14] NY ECON WRAP (S & L) BY ELAINE JOHANSON (NEW YORK)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-256772
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Stock prices in the United States were higher today (Thursday) led by a run-up in the technology sector. Trading, in general, was cautious as Wall Street waits for key U-S employment data due for release Friday. VOA correspondent Elaine Johanson reports from New York:

    TEXT: The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 40 points, about one-third of one percent, closing at 11- thousand-39. The Standard and Poor's 500 index rose 11 points to 14-hundred-eight. And the NASDAQ composite surged almost three percent, setting a new record high. Technology stocks, once again, drove the stock market. Otherwise, the rally was narrow. The technology components of the Dow Jones propped up the index - among them, Hewlett-Packard, I-B-M and Microsoft.

    /// BEGIN OPT ///

    Analysts are divided on whether the stock market will rise - or should rise - to new highs by year's end. Hugh Johnson - chief investment officer at the First Albany brokerage firm - believes it would be good for the market to back off a bit:

    /// JOHNSON ACT ///

    The healthiest thing for the market would be to get rid of this over-valuation problem, particularly in technology - a little bit of a decline maybe to the, say, 10-thousand-500 or lower level. That will set the stage for an on- going bull market (up market). So everybody should stay fairly optimistic as we look towards the year 2000.

    /// END ACT ///

    /// END OPT ///

    New home sales in the United States rose more than 16 percent in October - the highest level in six years - despite rising mortgage rates. Analysts wondered why. It is another part of the economic puzzle the experts are trying to work out to gauge the growth trends of the U-S economy.

    /// REST OPT ///

    Wall Street is watching closely a major deal in the agrochemical industry in Europe. Swiss chemical giant Novartis and its British-Swedish rival AstraZeneca plan to spin off and merge their agricultural units. The new company will be the world's number one firm in crop protection. The deal comes amid slumping prices and growing controversy over the use of genetically-modified seeds. It has spurred hopes in the United States of further consolidation among U-S drug and so-called life sciences companies. Intel - the world's leading computer chip-maker - has found a problem in a small percentage of its Pentium- three chips that interferes with computer start-ups. But the company says the number of cases is small enough that it will continue producing the chips while trying to correct the problem. Investors were not turned off. Intel shares were up. U-S retailers presented a mixed picture for November. A lot of them did a lot of business. Many did not, despite a surge in Thanksgiving holiday shopping. Sales, overall, rose a less-than-expected four percent, sending the prices of most retail stocks down. (Signed) EB/EJ/LSF/TVM/JO 02-Dec-1999 16:49 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 2149 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America

    [15] THURSDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=12/2/1999
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-11575
    EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: The unexpectedly violent and destructive protests at the World Trade Organization conference in Seattle this week, have riveted the attention of the nation's editorial writers. In another domestic story, the tale of tens-of-thousands of American hospital patients dying due to medical mistakes, there are also a large number of comments. In foreign affairs, we read reaction to Yasser Arafat's crackdown on Palestinians criticizing his administration; the joint U-S Mexican search for drug violence victims; the formation of a new Northern Ireland assembly with both protestants and Catholics in charge; and early reaction to presidential contender George Bush's tax cut plan. Now, here with a closer look and some excerpts is ____________ and today's Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: The scenes of Seattle police tear gassing and arresting screaming protestors, while others smash store windows and spray paint graffiti, has captured the front pages of most U-S papers. In Georgia, "The Augusta Chronicle" says Seattle's Mayor and Washington State's Governor were a day late in calling out the state militia to help restore order. The paper criticizes the leniency first displayed by the Seattle police.

    VOICE: What the rioters needed were the tough crackdowns meted out by Chicago Mayor Richard Daley Senior's cops 31-years ago. [ a reference to the riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention] But Seattle police were trained to "kill them with kindness." The strategy did not work; in fact, it did not even stop charges of "police brutality." ... What should not be forgotten, though, is this W-T-O ministerial conference was not necessary in the first place. No business was conducted there that could not have been done through trade representatives and other channels.

    TEXT: In the rocky mountains, "The Colorado Springs Gazette" feels the protestors were not only wrong to cause damage, but they are also wrong about the core dispute, freer world trade via the W-T-O.

    VOICE: Perhaps the most constructive thing W-T- O leaders ... could have done would have been to purchase enough copies of Melvyn Krauss' short 1997 book "How Nations Grow Rich: The Case for Free Trade" and hand one to every demonstrator. . [Professor] Krauss ... makes the case for free trade unrestricted by government barriers or the export of government regulations.

    TEXT: In summing up its view of the demonstrators, both the peaceful and the anarchistic, "The San Jose [California] Mercury News" notes:

    VOICE: The process of expanding prosperity is, in part, one of breaking down barriers to trade. The astute critics of the W-T-O understand that, and want it to happen in a way that respects the environment and workers. They know their efforts will only be discredited by breaking windows.

    TEXT: Connecticut's "Waterbury Republican-American" puts it this way:

    VOICE: The World Trade Organization ... is an altogether necessary accessory in a fast- changing world. By no stretch of the imagination is it perfect, or perfectly virtuous, and it has potential to run afoul of its member states' legitimate concerns for sovereignty. But neither is it an enemy of the environment, Third World progress and human rights, as its foes contend.

    TEXT: "The New York Times" sums up its view, noting:

    VOICE: Protest leaders were right to condemn the lawlessness quickly. But the W-T-O's 135- members will make a huge mistake if they fail to grasp the core belief fueling these unruly protests -- that the W-T-O is far too insular, that is has displayed too little sensitivity for issues like workers' rights and the environment, and that its secretive procedures undermine public trust.

    TEXT: Now, comments on another troubling story, word that almost 100-thousand U-S hospital patients die each year due to medical staff mistakes. In calling for -- Safety for All Patients - "Boston's Christian Science Monitor" reminds doctors of the expression: Physician, heal thyself -- before suggesting:

    VOICE: ...The medical profession, like the airline or tracking industry, can easily improve its safety. ... This report serves as an alert for all of us to work harder at bringing more harmony, comfort, and sympathy to those seeking healing.

    TEXT: "The Miami Herald" wonders aloud -- why did not someone think of it sooner? -- that is creating a body to track medical errors and recommend corrections. ... Devising a system for determining what goes wrong, when and why in hospitals -- just as the national Transportation Safety Board vets airline, train, and highway accidents -- is the right approach.

    /// OPT ///

    TEXT: Looking to the Middle East and more criticism of Yasser Arafat's response to a manifesto accusing him of corruption, waste, and mismanagement, as well as his harsh treatment of his accusers, a group of Palestinian intellectuals. "The Chicago Tribune" surmises:

    VOICE: ...[Mr.] Arafat has a major credibility problem. ... U-S officials know he is a tyrant. Some argue that peace must come before democracy for the Palestinians. That is wrong. It is precisely amid the peace process that more democracy is needed, to build confidence in that process at home and abroad.

    TEXT: On New York's Long Island, "Newsday" is even more frank, as it sums up its view of the Palestinian leader's problem.

    VOICE: ...Justifying last week's arrests [of several signers of the manifesto] a top Palestinian security official said that open dissent could not be allowed while [Mr.] Arafat was negotiating final-status details of the peace ... with Israel. But a Palestinian unity artificially maintained through repression of political debate is good neither for Palestinians nor for the peace process.

    /// END OPT ///

    TEXT: Turning to this hemisphere, and the huge U-S Mexican joint search near the border at Juarez, for victims of drug trafficking violence, "The Tulsa [Oklahoma] World" laments:

    VOICE: While the U-S has spent billions [of dollars] to block illegal drugs from Mexico, and Central, and South America, the flow continues by boat, by air, and by land. While efforts should continue to intercept and confiscate drugs, the best long-term solution to shutting down drug cartels is in drying up their market.

    TEXT: Several papers continue to salute the formation of a joint, Protestant, Catholic National Assembly in strife-torn Northern Ireland, which began meeting this week, after announcing a Cabinet that will run the province. Pennsylvania's "Greensburg Tribune-Review" suggests:

    VOICE: It will take more than just good intentions to slow the momentum of generations of hate and death. But this past week's developments offer hope that "the Troubles" that have plagued this emerald isle are near an end.

    TEXT: In this hemisphere, a complicated story about a five-year-old boy who recently survived a boat trip from Cuba to Florida is drawing a lot of attention. His mother and several others drowned, but little Elian Gonzalez was rescued by fishermen. His family in Florida wants him to stay, but his father in Cuba is demanding his return. "The St. Petersburg Times' says:

    VOICE: His] case ... should be decided on its own merits. It should not be used as a pawn in the politics that divide the United States and the Communist nation.

    TEXT: "The Bergen County Record" in New Jersey agrees:

    VOICE: This case is politically and emotionally complicated. But the paramount consideration should be the well-being of Elian, who has suffered so much already. He should live where he will receive the most love and feel the most cared for, even if that means sending him back to Cuba to be with his father.

    TEXT: Lastly, some conflicting views of the tax cut plan unveiled this week by Texas Governor, and leading Republican presidential contender, George W. Bush. He plans to cut 483-billion dollars in various tax changes during the next 10-years, and "The Oklahoman" in Oklahoma City says of the proposal:

    VOICE: ...[it] is pragmatic if not overly ambitious and, it seems to us, a commendable framework for serious discussions the presidential campaign picks up steam.

    VOICE: Taking a much different view is today's "Manchester [New Hampshire] Union Leader", which scoffs in part:

    VOICE: ...Where is [Mr.] Bush's courage? Where is his leadership? This is a plan Bob Dole would have campaigned on in 1996! ... [Mr.] Bush ... should be promoting brave new tax reforms and cutting the size and scope of government accordingly to make up for lost revenues.

    TEXT: On that note, we conclude this sampling of comment from Thursday's U-S press.
    NEB/ANG/RAE 02-Dec-1999 12:25 PM EDT (02-Dec-1999 1725 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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