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Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation: News in English, 03-10-16

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation: News in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation at <http://www.cybc.com.cy/>

CONTENTS

  • [01] HEADLINES LUNCH
  • [02] TASSOS VETO
  • [03] VERHEUGEN CYPRUS
  • [04] EU CONSTITUTION
  • [05] APOSTLE ANDREAS
  • [06] VOLLEYBALL
  • [07] MIDEAST WRAP
  • [08] US FERRY
  • [09] POPE 25TH
  • [10] SPACE CHINA
  • [11] BUSH BEEF
  • [12] WEATHER LUNCH Tuesday 16/10/03

  • [01] HEADLINES LUNCH

    The president of the republic Tassos Papadopoulos stated that the government will not veto Turkey's European course, because such a move would be unwise under the current circumstances,

    Commissioner for Enlargement Gunther Verheugen stated that Cyprus has the EU's full support in its efforts to achieve a solution of the Cyprus issue,

    Disagreements continue over the restoration methods of the Apostolos Andreas Monastery, following yesterday's decision by the Cabinet, to start work, on the basis of suggestions by experts who are undertaking the project

    and

    Palestinian police have detained three suspected militants in connection with a bomb attack on a U.S. diplomatic convoy that killed three U.S. security guards in the Gaza Strip.

    [02] TASSOS VETO

    The president of the republic Tassos Papadopoulos stated that the government will not veto Turkey's European course, because such a move would be unwise under the current circumstances. President Papadopoulos was responding to a question by a Turkish cypriot reporter, on whether Cyprus, following its accession, possibly without a solution of the Cyprus problem, will veto Turkey's accession. Pointing out that in order for Turkey to join, the other twenty four members also have to approve, President Papadopoulos stressed that the veto is for the big powers and it is more convincing if it comes from them. He also expressed the view that if Cyprus vetoes Turkey's accession, Ankara will absorb the occupied territories, which will lead to a permanent division of the island.

    [03] VERHEUGEN CYPRUS

    Commissioner for Enlargement Gunther Verheugen stated that Cyprus has the EU's full support in its efforts to achieve a solution of the Cyprus issue. He said that the republic is already a member state, also referring to his discussions with President Papadopoulos which centered on various European issues, such as the Intergovernmental Conference and the initiative for a wider Europe. In statements to our station, Commissioner Verheugen stressed that this initiative is one of the most important missions undertaken by Cyprus, because President Papadopoulos has very important experiences that can help Europe develop its relations with eastern neighbours such as Syria and Lebanon.

    [04] EU CONSTITUTION

    European Union leaders today started hard bargaining on the balance of power in an enlarged Europe, but there was likely to be more arguing than deciding during their summit negotiations on a new constitution.

    After weeks of sometimes bitter public skirmishing, leaders of the 15 member states and 10 joining countries confronted the most sensitive issues of voting rights, seats on the executive European Commission and EU defence integration.

    The disputes pit a majority of small member states, fearful of losing influence, against the big EU powers -- Germany, France, Italy and Britain -- determined that their population size and political weight be reflected in EU decision-making.

    Final decisions are not expected until December, but European Commission President Romano Prodi warned leaders against plunging Europe into an unseemly power struggle in the coming weeks through "narrow nationalism".

    He also urged the EU's Italian presidency to put forward compromise proposals soon since time is running short.

    [05] APOSTLE ANDREAS

    Disagreements continue over the restoration methods of the Apostolos Andreas Monastery, following yesterday's decision by the Cabinet, to start work, on the basis of suggestions by experts who are undertaking the project. Education and Culture minister Pefkios Yeorgiades and Bishop of Paphos Chrysostomos agreed with the decision to implement plan B that calls for the maintaining of the arches and facade of the church, but removing the cells. DIKO deputy and legal advisor of the Apostolos Andreas Administrative Committee Zacharias Koulias expressed strong opposition to the plan, claiming that it will destroy the historic value of the church. The education minister said that as an architect by profession, he accepts the suggestion of the Technical and Scientific Board, that is the technical advisor of the republic.

    [06] VOLLEYBALL

    Three police officers and two citizens were injured last night during clashes at a first division volleyball match in Nicosia, between local clubs Omonia and Apoel. Police arrested an eighteen year old, who remains in custody. A police announcement said that the clashes were sparked when supporters of one team, began stoning opposing supporters from outside the ground. Extensive damage was caused to the ground as well as three police cars.

    [07] MIDEAST WRAP

    Palestinian police have detained three suspected militants in connection with a bomb attack on a U.S. diplomatic convoy that killed three U.S. security guards in the Gaza Strip.

    The announcement of the arrests followed world pressure on the Palestinian Authority to crack down on militants after the bombing, a rare attack on foreigners and the first to kill Americans during a three-year-old uprising for statehood.

    Security sources said the three men belonged to the Popular Resistance Committees, an umbrella group of militants that has taken responsibility for roadside bombings against Israeli forces but denied any role in the attack on the U.S. convoy.

    The United States was sending a Federal Bureau of Investigation team to the region and made clear that Washington, whose plan for Palestinian-Israeli peace has been stymied by more violence, would play a key role in inquiries into Wednesday's attack.

    [08] US FERRY

    Federal authorities will step in to investigate the crash of a commuter ferry that killed at least 10 people, injured many others and forced some panicked passengers to plunge into the cold waters of New York Bay.

    The National Transportation Safety Board, which will seek to find out why the ferry slammed into the New York's Staten Island terminal and sent at least 42 people to hospitals, many with "crush" injuries.

    Police sources told local media that the assistant captain left the scene of the crash and tried to kill himself by shooting himself in the head with a pellet gun and slitting his wrists.

    Bloomberg would not comment on the reports but said the man was alive and being questioned. All of the 16-member crew would be tested for drugs and alcohol.

    The ferry was docking in winds gusting at 45 miles per hour and witnesses said it was traveling at high speed as it neared the terminal.

    An estimated 1,500 people were on board the boat which can carry up to 6 thousand people.

    [09] POPE 25TH

    Sapped by age and infirmity, Pope John Paul marked his 25th anniversary as head of the Roman Catholic Church with the world's attention focused on his past achievements and future uncertainties.

    The pope, joined by cardinals and bishops from around the world, began his big day by signing a major document on the role of bishops.

    The main event is an open-air mass in the early evening, roughly the time of day that he first appeared to the world after his shock election on October 16, 1978 as the first non-Italian pontiff in 455 years.

    The pope's health has appeared to go into decline recently and speculation about how long he might live or who will succeed him has cast a long shadow over the festivities.

    [10] SPACE CHINA

    Looking slightly dazed at all the fuss, China's first man in orbit returned to a hero's welcome, completing an historic odyssey and fuelling the country's more ambitious dreams of a space station or space walk.

    Yang Liwei emerged from the Shenzhou V capsule and waved, drawing cheers from the horde of 600 locals, recovery workers and police who greeted him on the chill, sunlit steppes of Inner Mongolia.

    Premier Wen Jiabao sent immediate congratulations, hailing the mission as a "complete success" after a chat with Yang, whose mission came four decades after the Soviet Union and the United States pioneered manned space flight.

    The 38-year-old fighter pilot turned astronaut, raised in China's decaying northeast "rust belt", received flowers and ribbons from well-wishers and was then carried in a chair to waiting doctors for a checkup.

    [11] BUSH BEEF

    And finally,

    Hold the sushi.

    U.S. President George W. Bush is likely to feast on prime Japanese beef when he is in Tokyo on Friday for a brief visit.

    Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who munched hamburgers when he visited Bush's Texas ranch in May, said the menu for dinner with his close ally would feature "wagyu", a high grade of Japanese beef.

    The beef is likely to be grilled on a hot plate, a style of cooking known as "teppanyaki" that often features fancy flourishes of cooking utensils by the chef.

    Japan's best marbled Kobe or Matsuzaka beef, from pampered cows which are said to imbibe beer and receive massages to improve the meat, is fabulously expensive.

    Beef has been a touchy subject between the two nations in the past, the source of occasional fierce trade rows centred on imports of U.S. meat.

    [12] WEATHER LUNCH

    It will be mainly fine this afternoon. Winds will be light to moderate southwesterly to northwesterly, force three to four, over slight seas. Temperatures will rise to 29 degrees inland, 28 on the south and east coast, 26 on the west coast and 20 on the mountains. Tonight fine weather will continue. Winds will be light northwesterly, force two to three, over calm to slight seas. Temperatures will drop to 17 degrees inland and on the west coast, 18 on the south and east coast and 10 on the mountains. The fire hazard remains very high in all forest areas.
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