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Cyprus News Agency: News in English, 04-06-02

Cyprus News Agency: News in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Cyprus News Agency at <http://www.cyna.org.cy>


CONTENTS

  • [01] Jack Straw: No agenda for recognition of northern Cyprus regime
  • [02] Papadopoulos outlines vision for Cyprus
  • [03] Cyprus President: solution must serve interests of Cypriots
  • [04] Annan's report should leave door open for talks, says Nicosia
  • [05] Cyprus Stock Exchange
  • [06] Weather and Temperatures for Cyprus
  • [07] UN chief recommends extension of UNFICYP mandate
  • [08] UN SG’s report on UNFICYP (FULL TEXT)
  • [09] UN SG's report on his mission of good offices in Cyprus (FULL TEXT)
  • [10] UN chief says Cyprus settlement needs more than a plan

  • [01] Jack Straw: No agenda for recognition of northern Cyprus regime

    1005:CYPPRESS:01

    Jack Straw: No agenda for recognition of northern Cyprus regime

    London, Jun 2 (CNA) -- There is no agenda on the part of the British government to recognise the Turkish Cypriot illegal regime in the Turkish-occupied northern part of Cyprus nor there is any intention to punish the Greek Cypriot community for the "no" vote at the 24 April referendum, British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw has stated.

    In a reply letter to British Euro MP's Theresa Villiers and Ian Twinn, who were critical of Labours' remarks that the socalled embargo on Cyprus' Turkish-occupied area should be lifted, Straw assures that ''our objective remains to see a reunified Cyprus within the European Union''.

    [02] Papadopoulos outlines vision for Cyprus

    1010:CYPPRESS:02

    Papadopoulos outlines vision for Cyprus

    Boston, Jun 2 (CNA) -- Cyprus President Tassos Papadopoulos has described a UN proposal for a comprehensive settlement ''a good basis for an eventual solution'' and said he would work for a bizonal, bicommunal federation, pointing out that a workable, equitable and acceptable plan must be agreed upon by all.

    Addressing a distinguished audience at the Kennedy School of Government, at Harvard University, he expressed disappointment that the UN proposal (Annan plan), which he said was geared to satisfy Turkey's demands, did not allow the people of Cyprus to accept it.

    President Papadopoulos said that a Cyprus settlement would benefit not only the Cypriots but would also serve as a model of hope to other similar situations and promote stability and security in the wider region of the Mediterranean.

    Referring to US-Cyprus relations, he said Cypriots were determined to achieve new levels of cooperation and as members of the European Union contribute to the consolidation of the transatlantic relationship between the EU and the US.

    ''Our position should not be mistaken or misunderstood: We do not reject the Annan plan. We still believe it is a good basis for an eventual solution. We still accept a bizonal, bicommunal function federation, but this version of the Plan was not. But it is too important to expect us to rush into such a fundamental and irreversible change with what can only be described as an unseemly haste which would not be acceptable to any other state,'' Papadopoulos said.

    He noted that the plan since it was put forward had changed significantly and said that the way ahead was ''to continue to work hard until we reach a plan that is both workable, equitable and acceptable to all of us.''

    President Papadopoulos said that concerns of the Greek Cypriots which he raised during negotiations ''went unheeded'' and it seemed that everybody was so keen to get Turkey and the Turkish Cypriots on board that mere acceptance by the Turkish side to engage in talks was considered to be such a great improvement on past attitudes that it had to be ''rewarded by satisfying all demands made by the Turkish side.''

    He explained that the concerns he had raised related to the dissolution of the Republic of Cyprus upon an agreed settlement, the delay in benefits to Greek Cypriots when at the same time Turkish Cypriots were to receive all benefits up-front, lengthy delays in paying limited and uncertain amount of compensation for property, the denial of many refugees to return to their homes in the Turkish Cypriot administered area and the right all Turkish settlers would have claimed to remain on the island.

    ''Some of my most profound worries about the plan did not concern those areas where we felt that the compromises offered or imposed were simply not fair to us. They were promoted by my concern for that kind of Cyprus that would have resulted from this plan and its ability to play its proper role in the EU,'' he explained.

    He said that it should therefore come as no surprise to any objective observer that a resounding 76 per cent of Greek Cypriots rejected the plan, a percentage that includes some 70 per cent of the refugees.

    ''They cannot all be naive. They cannot all be misguided or deceived. The people of Cyprus are a highly literate society, very politicized and have a proud tradition of democratic process and freedom of expression,'' he said.

    President Papadopoulos said it was not possible to know whether the plan would have worked, had it been accepted in April's referenda among the island's two communities.

    ''We cannot know and thus we do not know. It may have worked but what if it did not?'' he warned.

    Papadopoulos stressed that the decision of the people must be respected by all and said that he was obligated and bound by political morality and constitutional provisions to respect it.

    ''Nobody has the right to criticize the people or be vindictive or punish a whole people in the exercise of its supreme right in a democratic way rejected a plan designed by others and determining its future and that of generations to come,'' he added.

    He said that through negotiations, he intended to pursue the reunification of the country, its economy and society, he wanted a functional solution in a functional state structure, in which no one community would impose its will on the other, he sought to secure respect for human rights, an end of the occupation and gradual withdrawal of all foreign troops with the aim of full demilitarisation and safeguards that the solution to be found would actually be implemented.

    On bilateral cooperation, President Papadopoulos said the two countries shared the same fundamental values and principles and referred to the common aim to fight effectively international terrorism, noting that Cyprus joined immediately and actively the US in the international coalition to fight terrorism and granted overflight rights to the US and facilities for humanitarian purposes and emergency situations.

    [03] Cyprus President: solution must serve interests of Cypriots

    1045:CYPPRESS:03

    Cyprus President: solution must serve interests of Cypriots

    Boston, Jun 2 (CNA) -- An agreed political settlement in Cyprus should serve the interests of the Greek and Turkish Cypriots rather than those of outsiders, Cyprus President Tassos Papadopoulos has stressed, pointing out that Greek Cypriots can accept a hard solution as a fair one cannot be found at gunpoint.

    President Papadopoulos told a distinguished audience at Harvard University that Cyprus would not block Turkey's European aspirations, if the other 24 EU members decide that Ankara met the requirements laid down by Brussels.

    He also said that the people of Cyprus were disappointed at the absence of a solution, following the rejection in April of a UN-proposed plan, but others felt let down because their own designs had not been served.

    Responding to questions, he acknowledged that political developments globally were not resolved on legal grounds and indicated that strength gave people liberty to bypass international law and order.

    ''What is important is to find an agreed solution between Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots for our own interest, rather than serve the interests of the outsiders, mainly of Turkey, or the Europeans, or the US or other countries,'' he said, adding that the Turkey had nearly all its demands met during talks in Switzerland.

    He dismissed suggestions that Cyprus was isolated in the world arena and outlined a long list of meetings and visits to the island by heads of state, saying he did not feel isolated. With regard to the absence of meetings in Washington, he said the time was not right and there was no request for any meeting.

    Papadopoulos said the disappointment among Europeans was understandable but stressed that ''nobody can be or is more disappointed than ourselves that we did not find a solution.''

    ''Our disappointment is because we are there. People under occupation and oppression and therefore we are the ones who we really want this to be rectified as soon as possible. The others are disappointed probably because their own plans have not been served as planned. But for us it is a question of survival as a state,'' he added.

    Asked about the effect Cyprus' accession to the EU could have on future prospects for talks, he expressed hope that the rejection by the Greek Cypriots of the UN plan would not spurn other countries to try and solidify the partition by measures or steps that would prevent reunification.

    ''If and when the other 24 equal members of the EU would decide that Turkey meets all the requirements to join the EU, or to get a date for accession negotiations, Cyprus will not object. Cyprus would welcome Turkey in the EU provided that Turkey would comply with the requirements of the EU and would behave as a European state, respecting the acquis communataire which certainly prohibits any member state to have invasion troops on the soil of another European country,'' he said with regard to Turkey-EU ties.

    Responding to other questions, he said that ''political developments in the world today are not resolved on legal grounds and international law and order has many interpretations, as many as the interests of those who violate these rights.''

    ''The stronger you are, the more liberty you are given to bypass that. We however in Cyprus must be realistic enough that you dont start a solution from a blank page, meaning, we dont start from zero. We have in Cyprus a situation of occupation which you can not remove by any other way except by a negotiated settlement. We should be ready to make sacrifices to accept that the solution cannot be fair,'' he said.

    He said one could not have a fair solution, when one was negotiating under the guns of 35.000 troops which occupy one's country.

    ''The solution must be bitter. If the solution will be hard for Greek Cypriots, let it be. If you cannot have a fair solution at least let's have a solution that will be durable, viable because the system provided will be functional. And this one, offered to us, was neither functional nor it would achieve the reunification of our country,'' he explained.

    On the role of cultural and scientific exchanges, President Papadopoulos said these played a great part in bringing about a solution, adding that his government would encourage further development of relations between the island's two communities.

    He said Cyprus had asked the EU to give now the Turkish Cypriots the 259 million euros which would have been given to them had there been a solution and said the government had liberalised trade between the two communities and was engaged in discussions with the Turkish Cypriots and the EU about securing absolute freedom of movement between persons, capital, enterprises and businesses.

    Papadopoulos said any measures to be taken should aim at reunification and pointed out that the government would never agree to two separate states in Cyprus, and said he did not believe that the EU would accept it either.

    Concluding he said, that the Greek Cypriots failed to be satisfied by the present version of the Annan plan, but that did not lead to a rejection of a solution.

    [04] Annan's report should leave door open for talks, says Nicosia

    1510:CYPPRESS:04

    Annan's report should leave door open for talks, says Nicosia

    Nicosia, Jun 2 (CNA) -- Cyprus Government Spokesman Kypros Chrysostomides said here today that a UN report on efforts to find a negotiated settlement should allow room for future dialogue and should be objective.

    [05] Cyprus Stock Exchange

    
    
    
    1525:CYPPRESS:05
    Cyprus Stock Exchange Nicosia, Jun 2 (CNA) - The Cyprus Stock Exchange (CSE) All Share Index closed at today's stock exchange meeting as follows: CSE General Index 79,49 ( 0,52) Traded Value CYP 175.808 FTSE/CYSE 20 CYP 132.698 353,44 ( 0,59) FTSE Med 100 6.366,86 (-0,29) Sectoral Indices Banks CYP 98.252 102,71 ( 0,53) Approved Investment Companies CYP 3.210 71,64 ( 0,43) Insurance Companies CYP 547 14,21 ( 0,71) Manufacturing Companies CYP 3.042 51,07 ( 0,33) Tourism Companies CYP 3.314 49,13 ( 0,27) Trading Companies CYP 20.424 22,02 ( 0,18) Building and Cement Companies CYP 1.414 64,72 ( 0,58) Énformation Technology Companies CYP 1.284 2,37 ( 0,42) Financial Services Companies CYP 7.224 7,98 (-0,50) Fish Culture Companies CYP 0 11,48 (-0,43) Hotels CYP 5.482 27,59 ( 1,55) Other Companies CYP 19.367 65,31 ( 0,55) * The third column presents the percentage variation of

    [06] Weather and Temperatures for Cyprus

    
    
    
    1655:CYPPRESS:06
    Weather and Temperatures for Cyprus Nicosia, Jun 2 (CNA) - Today's weather and temperatures for Cyprus, according to the Meteorological Service at Larnaca International Airport are: Temperatures (degrees Celcius) --------------------------------------------------------------- Station Maximum Minimum Weather (At 1200 UTC) --------------------------------------------------------------- Nicosia 31 15 SHOWERS Larnaca 26 17 FINE Limassol 28 18 HAZY Paphos 24 16 FAIR

    [07] UN chief recommends extension of UNFICYP mandate

    1740:CYPPRESS:07

    UN chief recommends extension of UNFICYP mandate

    by Apostolis Zoupaniotis

    United Nations, Jun 2 (CNA) - UN Secretary General Kofi Annan, in a report to the UN Security Council, recommends that the mandate of the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) be extended for a further period of six months, until 15 December 2004.

    In the report, which covers developments from 11 November 2003 to 20 May 2004, Annan notes that he intends to conduct a review, to be completed within three months, of UNFICYPs mandate, force levels and concept of operations, in the light of developments on the ground, the positions of the parties and any views the Security Council might have.

    In his observations, Annan says ''the situation along the ceasefire lines remained calm'' and that ''the continuous flow of people from both sides through the crossing points has now become a regular feature on the island.''

    ''It is encouraging to see a further decrease in the already low number of incidents related to the crossings compared to the previous reporting period. I urge the Turkish Cypriot authorities to provide full freedom of movement for UNFICYP so that it can carry out its mandate more effectively,'' he adds.

    Annan says that, ''following the referenda of 24 April, consultations have been conducted with both sides on the island and the guarantor powers, and I remain convinced that, in the absence of a comprehensive settlement, the presence of UNFICYP on the island continues to be necessary for the maintenance of the ceasefire.''

    ''However, in view of the watershed vote of 24 April, and as part of an overall reappraisal of the United Nations peace activities in Cyprus, I intend to conduct a review, to be completed within three months, of UNFICYPs mandate, force levels and concept of operations, in the light of developments on the ground, the positions of the parties and any views the Security Council might have,'' he notes.

    He adds that he will submit ''recommendations on the adjustments or restructuring that may be required'' and that ''meanwhile, I recommend that the Security Council extend the mandate of the Force for a further period of six months until 15 December 2004.''

    Annan says ''the military situation along the ceasefire lines remained generally calm and stable'' but notes that ''the number of air violations increased from 49 in the last reporting period to 67; 20 were by Turkish military aircraft, 2 by Greek military aircraft, 13 by Cypriot police helicopters and the remaining 32 were of unknown origin.''

    ''In line with past experience for the season, there were fewer crossings of the maritime security lines, the seaward extension of the median line of the buffer zone that vessels from either side are advised not to cross'', he adds.

    Annan notes that ''restrictions imposed on UNFICYP in July 2000 by the Turkish forces/Turkish Cypriot security forces, partially eased in May 2003, continued to hinder the operations of UNFICYP, including in the fenced-in area of Varosha.''

    ''The United Nations holds the Government of Turkey responsible for the maintenance of the status quo in Varosha. The violation of the military status quo in Strovilia persisted,'' he adds.

    Referring to the crossings of people to and from the Turkish occupied areas, Annan says that by 1 May 2004, ''3.7 million crossings by Greek Cypriots to the north and Turkish Cypriots to the south have taken place.''

    Annan says that during the reporting period, UNFICYP facilitated 138 bicommunal events at the Ledra Palace Hotel, bringing together 7,300 Greek and Turkish Cypriots, adding that UNFICYP also assisted in facilitating several bicommunal press conferences and seminars leading up to the 24 April 2004 referenda.

    On the issue of persons enclaved in the Turkish occupied areas, Annan notes that ''UNFICYP continued to perform its mandated humanitarian tasks in support of the 411 Greek Cypriots and 153 Maronites living in the northern part of the island.''

    Regarding the Committee on Missing Persons, Annan says he wrote to the two leaders ''noting that a solution to this humanitarian issue was overdue and that a fresh commitment to solve it was necessary.''

    ''While both sides expressed readiness to follow my suggestions, no formal meetings took place during the reporting period. Meanwhile, the third member ad interim continued to work with the two sides to have the Committee on Missing Persons restart its activities. The Greek Cypriot side proceeded with its programme of exhumation and identification,'' he notes.

    On the financial aspects of the operation, Annan says the UN General Assembly ''appropriated the amount of 43.8 million dollars for the maintenance of UNFICYP for the period from 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2004,'' which included the voluntary contribution of one third of the cost of the Force, equivalent to 14.6 million dollars, from the Government of Cyprus and the voluntary contribution of 6.5 million dollars from the Government of Greece.

    [08] UN SG’s report on UNFICYP (FULL TEXT)

    1745:CYPPRESS:08

    UN SGs report on UNFICYP (FULL TEXT) by Apostolis Zoupaniotis

    United Nations, Jun 2 (CNA) -- Followed is the full text of the UN Secretary-Generals report on UNFICYP.

    Report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations operation in Cyprus

    1. Introduction

    1. The present report on the United Nations operation in Cyprus covers developments from 11 November 2003 to 20 May 2004 and brings up to date the record of activities carried out by the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) pursuant to Security Council resolution 186 (1964) of 4 March 1964 and subsequent Council resolutions, the most recent of which was resolution 1517 (2003) of 24 November 2003.

    2. During this period, my Special Adviser on Cyprus, Alvaro de Soto, returned to Cyprus for the resumption of negotiations on the comprehensive settlement agreement, on which I am reporting separately. Zbigniew Wlosowicz continued as my acting Special Representative and Chief of Mission. Major General Hebert Figoli (Uruguay) was appointed as Force Commander on 7 January 2004. As at 4 May 2004, the strength of UNFICYP was 1,201 military personnel and 46 civilian police officers (see annex).

    II. Activities of the Force

    A. Maintenance of the ceasefire and military status quo

    3. The military situation along the ceasefire lines remained generally calm and stable. The number of incidents such as construction, ill discipline and moves forward into the buffer zone was negligible.

    4.The number of air violations increased from 49 in the last reporting period to 67; 20 were by Turkish military aircraft, 2 by Greek military aircraft, 13 by Cypriot police helicopters and the remaining 32 were of unknown origin. In line with past experience for the season, there were fewer crossings of the maritime security lines, the seaward extension of the median line of the buffer zone that vessels from either side are advised not to cross.

    5. Restrictions imposed on UNFICYP in July 2000 by the Turkish forces/Turkish Cypriot security forces, partially eased in May 2003, continued to hinder the operations of UNFICYP, including in the fenced-in area of Varosha. The United Nations holds the Government of Turkey responsible for the maintenance of the status quo in Varosha. The violation of the military status quo in Strovilia persisted.

    6. In the latter half of the reporting period, UNFICYP conducted intense planning and training for a possible transition to a new United Nations operation in Cyprus, in the event of a settlement, while continuing to fulfil its existing mandate.

    7. UNFICYP continued to support the Mines Technical Adviser in preparing for the clearing of minefields in the buffer zone. It is hoped that mine clearance activities will commence in the summer after civilian contractors are selected and accredited.

    8. On 28 April, following the rejection of the proposed plan for a settlement by the Greek Cypriot side, and its acceptance by the Turkish Cypriot side, at separate and simultaneous referenda, the Council of the European Union adopted a regulation dealing with the movement of goods and people between the north and the south, following the entry of the divided Cyprus into the European Union. The regulation states explicitly that it does not affect the mandate of the United Nations in the buffer zone in any way.

    B. Restoration of normal conditions and humanitarian functions

    9. As of 1 May 2004, 3.7 million crossings by Greek Cypriots to the north and Turkish Cypriots to the south have taken place at the Ledra, Ayios Dometios/Metehan, Pergamos and Strovilia crossing points since 23 April 2003 when they were opened. UNFICYP continued to assist the orderly movement of civilians and vehicles through the buffer zone at these authorized crossing points. UNFICYP attended to, monitored and followed up on more than 50 cases of unauthorized crossings, thefts, traffic violations, accidents and unauthorized photography. The Greek Cypriot side pressed criminal charges in 16 cases involving Turkish Cypriots in the south and the Turkish Cypriot side pressed criminal charges in 38 cases involving Greek Cypriots in the north. UNFICYP visited Turkish Cypriots in the south and Greek Cypriots in the north detained as a result of these cases. Further, UNFICYP facilitated 32 cases of medical evacuations from the north to medical facilities in the south.

    10. During the reporting period, UNFICYP facilitated 138 bicommunal events at the Ledra Palace Hotel, bringing together 7,300 Greek and Turkish Cypriots. A concert in November 2003 attracted 1,500 youth, and a peace demonstration in March 2004 drew 500 participants from both communities. Other events included the monthly meetings of political leaders under the aegis of the Embassy of Slovakia. In addition, the United Nations Office for Project Services funded bicommunal presentations, language courses and musical events. UNFICYP also assisted in facilitating several bicommunal press conferences and seminars leading up to the 24 April 2004 referenda.

    11. UNFICYP continued to perform its mandated humanitarian tasks in support of the 411 Greek Cypriots and 153 Maronites living in the northern part of the island. Apart from regular welfare visits and ensuring delivery of humanitarian assistance, UNFICYP was involved in obtaining permission for elderly Greek Cypriots to return to their homes in the north. UNFICYP also assisted eight Turkish Cypriot families in the south to obtain birth certificates and other documentation as well as housing and medical care facilities.

    12. UNFICYPs support for civilian activities in the buffer zone continued. UNFICYP also facilitated a project funded by the United Nations Office for Project Services, which started in February 2004 to restore a historic Venetian Castle in the mixed village of Pyla in the buffer zone. UNFICYP approved requests by Turkish Cypriots to modernize and expand their farms and a request by a Greek Cypriot to build a house in the civil-use area within the United Nations Protected Area. Furthermore, UNFICYP facilitated the annual visit of Greek Cypriots to St. Georges Church in Varisha in the buffer zone to commemorate St. Georges day.

    III. Committee on Missing Persons

    13. In December 2003, I wrote to the two leaders noting that a solution to this humanitarian issue was overdue and that a fresh commitment to solve it was necessary. The Committee on Missing Persons should conclude its work without delay, taking full account of the agreement of 31 July 1997. To that end, I suggested that the members of the Committee on Missing Persons resume formal meetings, with the participation of the third member ad interim. While both sides expressed readiness to follow my suggestions, no formal meetings took place during the reporting period. Meanwhile, the third member ad interim continued to work with the two sides to have the Committee on Missing Persons restart its activities. The Greek Cypriot side proceeded with its programme of exhumation and identification.

    IV. Financial aspects

    14. As indicated in my previous report (S/2003/1078), the General Assembly, by its resolution 57/332 of 18 June 2003, appropriated the amount of $43.8 million for the maintenance of UNFICYP for the period from 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2004. That amount included the voluntary contribution of one third of the cost of the Force, equivalent to $14.6 million, from the Government of Cyprus and the voluntary contribution of $6.5 million from the Government of Greece.

    15. My proposed budget for the maintenance of UNFICYP for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005, which amounts to $47.4 million, is currently under consideration by the General Assembly. Should the Security Council decide to extend the mandate of UNFICYP for a further period of six months, the cost of maintaining the Force would be limited to the amount approved by the General Assembly.

    16. As at 30 April 2004, the total outstanding assessed contributions to the special account for UNFICYP for the period from 16 June 1993 to 15 June 2004 amounted to $15.2 million. The total outstanding assessed contributions for all peacekeeping operations amounted to $1,273 million.

    V. Observations 17. The situation along the ceasefire lines remained calm. The continuous flow of people from both sides through the crossing points has now become a regular feature on the island. It is encouraging to see a further decrease in the already low number of incidents related to the crossings compared to the previous reporting period. I urge the Turkish Cypriot authorities to provide full freedom of movement for UNFICYP so that it can carry out its mandate more effectively.

    18. Following the referenda of 24 April, consultations have been conducted with both sides on the island and the guarantor powers, and I remain convinced that, in the absence of a comprehensive settlement, the presence of UNFICYP on the island continues to be necessary for the maintenance of the ceasefire. However, in view of the watershed vote of 24 April, and as part of an overall reappraisal of the United Nations peace activities in Cyprus, I intend to conduct a review, to be completed within three months, of UNFICYPs mandate, force levels and concept of operations, in the light of developments on the ground, the positions of the parties and any views the Security Council might have. I will submit recommendations on the adjustments or restructuring that may be required. Meanwhile, I recommend that the Security Council extend the mandate of the Force for a further period of six months until 15 December 2004.

    [09] UN SG's report on his mission of good offices in Cyprus (FULL TEXT)

    [10] UN chief says Cyprus settlement needs more than a plan

    2025:CYPPRESS:10

    UN chief says Cyprus settlement needs more than a plan

    by Apostolis Zoupaniotis

    United Nations, Jun 2 (CNA) - A solution to the Cyprus problem requires more than a comprehensive and carefully balanced peace plan, it also needs bold and determined political leadership on both sides in the island, as well as in Greece and Turkey, to negotiate with determination and to convince the people of the need to compromise, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan says in a report on his mission of good offices in Cyprus.

    In his report, Annan points out that his plan for a comprehensive settlement remains the only foreseeable basis, which the Cypriots have to achieve a solution, noting that, as the April 24 referenda on his plan resulted in a stalemate, he does not see any basis for resuming his good offices as long as this standoff remains.

    After giving a detailed account of UN efforts to reach a comprehensive settlement, Annan provides the structure of the finalised plan, as well as a summary of the main improvements, and then goes on to report developments leading up to the referenda on 24 April.

    He says that on the Turkish Cypriot side so-called prime minister Mehmet Ali Talat ''came out strongly in favour of a 'Yes' vote,'' while Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash opposed it.

    ''On the Greek Cypriot side, the situation was more complex,'' Annan notes, adding that President Tassos Papadopoulos ''in a broadcast speech on 7 April 2004 called upon the people to reject the plan with a 'resounding No'.''

    ''Among other things, the speech challenged the wisdom of 'doing away with our internationally recognised state exactly at the very moment it strengthens its political weight, with its accession to the European Union'. I was surprised at this assessment, in the light of what Mr. Papadopoulos had said to me in Brussels in January. I was also surprised at his interpretation of the plan, since the plan is designed to allow each side to maintain its position on how the new state of affairs would come into being,'' Annan says.

    He adds that, ''given what he had said to me in The Hague in March 2003, I was concerned that the Greek Cypriot leader's speech appeared to call into question many fundamental aspects of the plan, even while acknowledging that the final version contained improvements.''

    ''I do not believe the speech accurately reflected the contents of the plan on a range of issues. Nor do I accept the argument in the speech, repeated thereafter, that when the plan was finalised, Turkey's concerns were satisfied and Greek Cypriot concerns largely ignored. It might have been possible to accommodate other Greek Cypriot concerns had the Greek Cypriot side been more willing to engage in give and take at Burgenstock and before, and to prioritise its objectives,'' Annan notes.

    Annan furthermore notes that the Greek Cypriot political parties in Cyprus, all members of the National Council, had to decide their positions in the light of President Papadopoulos' speech and, ''because it had awaited the final outcome of the negotiation, the 'Yes' campaign did not get up and running until the last 10 days before the referendum.''

    ''My plan, which was becalmed for a year for lack of political will, has now run aground on the decision of the Greek Cypriot electorate. Its fate is a powerful illustration of the difficulties of finding a solution to this long-standing problem,'' Annan says.

    He notes that ''a solution obviously requires more than a comprehensive and carefully balanced peace plan, it also needs bold and determined political leadership on both sides in the island, as well as in Greece and Turkey, all in place at the same time, ready to negotiate with determination and to convince their people of the need to compromise.''

    ''The prospect of accession of Cyprus to the European Union and the opening of Turkey's path towards that goal provided a context of balanced incentives. The leadership of the Turkish Cypriots and Turkey did not seize that opportunity while it existed. By the time they were willing and able to seek a compromise solution, the incentives for compromise on the Greek Cypriot side had substantially weakened, the Greek Cypriot leadership was pursuing a less flexible policy, and time was running very short,'' Annan says.

    He adds that ''while the plan is legally null and void in the aftermath of the referendum, its acceptance by the Turkish Cypriot electorate means that the shape of any final settlement to reunify Cyprus would appear to be set.''

    ''The plan remains the only foreseeable basis which the Cypriots have to achieve a settlement,'' he notes.

    The UN chief says ''the rejection of such a plan by the Greek Cypriot electorate is a major setback,'' adding that ''Greek Cypriots rightly expect the international community to respect their decision.''

    ''It may be that, for a range of reasons, the electorate was not adequately prepared for the decision with which it was faced,'' he says, adding however that ''the sheer size of the 'No' vote raises even more fundamental questions,'' that is ''while they strongly state their wish to reunify, many see in a settlement very little gain, and quite a lot of inconvenience and risk.''

    Annan goes on to welcome the decision of the Turkish Cypriots. ''They have clearly and convincingly come out in favour of the reunification of Cyprus in a bicommunal, bizonal federation,'' he notes.

    ''While the Turkish Cypriots may feel rebuffed after the 24 April vote, their best course is not to turn their back on reunification, but to redouble their determination to achieve it. They, and Turkey, would be well advised to take every opportunity to reach out to the Greek Cypriots, and do everything in their power to promote reconciliation,'' Annan says.

    He adds that ''in the aftermath of the vote, the situation of the Turkish Cypriots calls for the attention of the international community as a whole, including the Security Council.''

    ''Recognition or assisting secession are clearly contrary to the resolutions of the Security Council, and would be contrary to the entire goal in view. Nor would such steps respect the will of the Turkish Cypriots, who have voted for reunification. However, this vote has undone whatever rationale might have existed for pressuring and isolating them. The rapid reaction of the EU to the new situation was a welcome first step,'' Annan says.

    As for the future of his mission of good offices, Annan says ''the outcome of the referenda has resulted in a stalemate'' and notes, ''I do not see any basis for resuming my good offices as long as this stand-off remains.''

    ''Meanwhile, in the aftermath of the watershed vote of 24 April, I believe that a fundamental reassessment of the full range of United Nations peace activities in Cyprus is timely,'' he points out and says that he intends ''to conduct a review, to be completed within three months, of UNFICYP's mandate, force levels and concept of operations, in the light of the developments on the ground, the positions of the parties, and any views the Security Council might have.''


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